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Does the Domestic Violence Act discriminate against Māori? Hook, Gary Raumati

By: Hook, Gary Raumati.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticlePublisher: 2009Description: 0.5.Subject(s): DOMESTIC VIOLENCE ACT 1995 | DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE | JUSTICE | MĀORI | POLICY | PŪNAHA TURE TAIHARA | RANGAHAU MĀORI | STATISTICS | TAITAMARIKI | TATAURANGA | TURE WHĀNAU | NEW ZEALAND | TŪKINOTANGA Ā-WHĀNAUOnline resources: Click here to access online In: MAI Review (1) 2009 : Article 7Summary: This article examines Māori domestic violence over the last 27 years through analysis of assault conviction data in New Zealand (male assaults female, and adult assaults child). The author finds that the trends in assault convictions suggest a reconsideration of current policies is required as efforts to ameliorate domestic violence are not working. The data supports the view that social factors influence domestic violence. The author notes that the problem of domestic violence should be amenable to social intervention; however exactly what the social factors are is largely unknown. The possible influence of legislation on assault convictions is explored, leading the author to question whether the Domestic Violence Act 1995 and the Sentencing Act 2002 discriminate against Māori. The article also investigates the relationship between unemployment and domestic violence and finds that unemployment may not be a driver for domestic violence. The author concludes that current approaches to addressing Māori domestic violence are speculative and thus may have limited success. Further, the research suggests the legislative approaches used may discriminate against Māori.
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MAI Review (1) 2009 : Article 7

This article examines Māori domestic violence over the last 27 years through analysis of assault conviction data in New Zealand (male assaults female, and adult assaults child). The author finds that the trends in assault convictions suggest a reconsideration of current policies is required as efforts to ameliorate domestic violence are not working. The data supports the view that social factors influence domestic violence. The author notes that the problem of domestic violence should be amenable to social intervention; however exactly what the social factors are is largely unknown. The possible influence of legislation on assault convictions is explored, leading the author to question whether the Domestic Violence Act 1995 and the Sentencing Act 2002 discriminate against Māori. The article also investigates the relationship between unemployment and domestic violence and finds that unemployment may not be a driver for domestic violence. The author concludes that current approaches to addressing Māori domestic violence are speculative and thus may have limited success. Further, the research suggests the legislative approaches used may discriminate against Māori.

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