Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Unreasonable force : New Zealand's journey towards banning the physical punishment of children Wood, Beth; Hassall, Ian B., 1941-; Hook, George; Ludbrook, Robert

By: Wood, Beth.
Contributor(s): Hassall, Ian B., 1941- | Hook, George | Ludbrook, Robert.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Wellington, New Zealand Save the Children New Zealand 2008Description: 284 p. ; 21 cm.ISBN: 9780473130954.Subject(s): CHILD ADVOCACY | CHILDREN | CHILDREN'S RIGHTS | CORPORAL PUNISHMENT | CRIMES (SUBSTITUTED SECTION 59) AMENDMENT ACT 2007 | DISCIPLINE | HUMAN RIGHTS | JUSTICE | PARENTING | PHYSICAL ABUSE | RELIGION | NEW ZEALAND | Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCROC) | LAW | CHILD ABUSEDDC classification: 649.64 UNR Online resources: Click here to access online Summary: This book documents the history of the banning of physical punishment of children in New Zealand which was passed into law under the Crimes (Substituted Section 59) Amendment Act. The authors provide a case study of the amendment to this legislation and explore the considerable debate surrounding the banning of physical punishment of children. Facets discussed include children's rights and the law, the impact of religious convictions upon the debate, the influential role played by the media, the work of children's advocates, the political sphere, and shifting public attitudes and the climate for change. The text is supported by an informative set of appendices.
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Access online Access online Online Available ON12120587
Book Book TRO 649.64 UNR Available A00669598B

Bibliographical references p. 206-245.

This book documents the history of the banning of physical punishment of children in New Zealand which was passed into law under the Crimes (Substituted Section 59) Amendment Act. The authors provide a case study of the amendment to this legislation and explore the considerable debate surrounding the banning of physical punishment of children. Facets discussed include children's rights and the law, the impact of religious convictions upon the debate, the influential role played by the media, the work of children's advocates, the political sphere, and shifting public attitudes and the climate for change. The text is supported by an informative set of appendices.

nz