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A study of social work practitioners and their needs when intervening in cases of elder abuse and neglect Maher, Penelope Ann

By: Maher, Penelope Ann.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: 2005Description: 140 p. ; computer file : PDF format (336Kb).Other title: A thesis submitted to the University of Canterbury in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of Masters of Arts in Social Work.Subject(s): ELDER ABUSE | NEGLECT | SOCIAL WORKERS | THESES | TREATMENT | OLDER PEOPLE | PREVENTIONDDC classification: 362.6042 STU Online resources: Click here to access online Summary: Thesis (MA - Social Work) - University of Canterbury, 2005. This thesis explores the needs of social work practitioners when intervening in cases of elder abuse and neglect. Ten social workers who work with older persons were interviewed to discover how training and knowledge prepared them for intervention in cases of elder abuse and neglect, how they ensured 'safe practice', what aspects of intervention in cases of elder abuse and neglect generated confidence or diffidence, and what they believe would be helpful to resource support and enhance their practice in cases of elder abuse and neglect. A qualitative research project was undertaken using semi-structured questions. Grounded theory was used to analyse the findings and constructivist theory helped to interpret the data. The thesis includes an exploration of the experiences of practitioners in situations of conflict and tension, and discusses how they manage working within a multi-disciplinary team, how they ensure professional and personal safety within the context of their practice, the importance of co-working and networking and how, with minimal education and training opportunities, they use reflective practice within supervision to develop practice wisdom. Five recommendations are made from the findings: that accurate statistics be collected on the number and nature of interventions; that education and training programmes be developed to provide an emphasis on legal issues, working within a multi-disciplinary team structure, and general conflict resolution skills; that networking be recognised as an important component of the social work role; that the term 'Safe Practice' be defined and acknowledged as a term that incorporates both practitioner and client; and that further research be undertaken in other New Zealand centres into the needs of social work practitioners when intervening in cases of elder abuse and neglect. This research should include less experienced practitioners, a supervisor's perspective and a Maori perspective.--AUTHOR'S ABSTRACT
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Thesis / dissertation Thesis / dissertation TRO 362.6042 STU Available A00669059B

Thesis (MA - Social Work) - University of Canterbury, 2005. This thesis explores the needs of social work practitioners when intervening in cases of elder abuse and neglect. Ten social workers who work with older persons were interviewed to discover how training and knowledge prepared them for intervention in cases of elder abuse and neglect, how they ensured 'safe practice', what aspects of intervention in cases of elder abuse and neglect generated confidence or diffidence, and what they believe would be helpful to resource support and enhance their practice in cases of elder abuse and neglect. A qualitative research project was undertaken using semi-structured questions. Grounded theory was used to analyse the findings and constructivist theory helped to interpret the data. The thesis includes an exploration of the experiences of practitioners in situations of conflict and tension, and discusses how they manage working within a multi-disciplinary team, how they ensure professional and personal safety within the context of their practice, the importance of co-working and networking and how, with minimal education and training opportunities, they use reflective practice within supervision to develop practice wisdom. Five recommendations are made from the findings: that accurate statistics be collected on the number and nature of interventions; that education and training programmes be developed to provide an emphasis on legal issues, working within a multi-disciplinary team structure, and general conflict resolution skills; that networking be recognised as an important component of the social work role; that the term 'Safe Practice' be defined and acknowledged as a term that incorporates both practitioner and client; and that further research be undertaken in other New Zealand centres into the needs of social work practitioners when intervening in cases of elder abuse and neglect. This research should include less experienced practitioners, a supervisor's perspective and a Maori perspective.--AUTHOR'S ABSTRACT

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