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Violence in society : New Zealand perspectives editor, Marie Connolly

Contributor(s): Connolly, Marie | (Ed.).
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Christchurch, N.Z.: Te Awatea Press, 2004Description: ix, 167 p.ISBN: 0476007909.Subject(s): CHILD PROTECTION | DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | ELDER ABUSE | NEW ZEALAND | CHILD ABUSEDDC classification: 303.60993 VIO Summary: The characteristics of violence are discussed from both a New Zealand and global context in the introductory chapter, "Violence and Society: An Overview", by Mike Doolan. Theoretical perspectives, prevention strategies, and New Zealand violent offence typologies are also outlined. In the chapter, "Child Abuse and Child Protection", Marie Connolly discusses the varying forms of child abuse and its consequences, and explores media violence. A comparative analysis is undertaken of the child protection and family support orientations to child welfare protection. Theresa Gannon, Tony Ward and Devon Polaschek's chapter, "Child Sexual Offenders", examines the characteristics of sexual offenders and the different pathways to sexual perpetration. Current treatment and rehabilitation practices are discussed, including the utilisation of strengths-based and risk management approaches. The extent of youth offending, including individual, family, community and macro-level factors, are highlighted in Nikki Evan's chapter, "Adolescent Offenders and Youth Justice". This section covers state responses and factors that make for effective interventions with adolescent offenders, such as risk assessment, recognition of criminogenic variables and choice of treatment modality. The chapter entitled "Violence in Interpersonal Relationships", by Yvonne Crichton-Hill, explores definitions and theories around interpersonal violence in Aotearoa New Zealand. The consequences of and responses to domestic violence are discussed, highlighting the need for greater resources in this area. The chapter by Verna Schofield, "Elder Abuse and Neglect: Causes and Consequences", addresses definitions of elder abuse and neglect, causal factors and impacts of this form of abuse. A discussion of service responses highlights that attitude shifts, legislation changes, and specialist knowledge are required to counter this growing issue. In Annabel Taylor's exploratory chapter, "Community and Stranger-Related Violence", definitions, prevalence and effects of this type of crime are discussed. Theoretical perspectives explaining stranger-related violence, policy, criminal justice system, and human service responses within New Zealand are also given consideration. The impacts on human service workers who encounter violence are analysed in the chapter entitled "Violence: The Personal and Professional Self", by Kate van Heugten. Here, the author conducts an examination of the importance of worker self-care and supportive organisational and policy structures. In the final chapter, "Family Violence: State and Community", Ken McMaster explores the roles, responsibilities and partnership between the state and community pertaining to anti-violence agendas, policies and initiatives. This chapter highlights the extent of family violence and the author asserts that there is still much that can be done to reduce its pervasiveness and benefit future generations.
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book Book TRO 303.60993 VIO Available A00639303B
Book Book TRO 303.60993 VIO Available A00668060B

The characteristics of violence are discussed from both a New Zealand and global context in the introductory chapter, "Violence and Society: An Overview", by Mike Doolan. Theoretical perspectives, prevention strategies, and New Zealand violent offence typologies are also outlined. In the chapter, "Child Abuse and Child Protection", Marie Connolly discusses the varying forms of child abuse and its consequences, and explores media violence. A comparative analysis is undertaken of the child protection and family support orientations to child welfare protection. Theresa Gannon, Tony Ward and Devon Polaschek's chapter, "Child Sexual Offenders", examines the characteristics of sexual offenders and the different pathways to sexual perpetration. Current treatment and rehabilitation practices are discussed, including the utilisation of strengths-based and risk management approaches. The extent of youth offending, including individual, family, community and macro-level factors, are highlighted in Nikki Evan's chapter, "Adolescent Offenders and Youth Justice". This section covers state responses and factors that make for effective interventions with adolescent offenders, such as risk assessment, recognition of criminogenic variables and choice of treatment modality. The chapter entitled "Violence in Interpersonal Relationships", by Yvonne Crichton-Hill, explores definitions and theories around interpersonal violence in Aotearoa New Zealand. The consequences of and responses to domestic violence are discussed, highlighting the need for greater resources in this area. The chapter by Verna Schofield, "Elder Abuse and Neglect: Causes and Consequences", addresses definitions of elder abuse and neglect, causal factors and impacts of this form of abuse. A discussion of service responses highlights that attitude shifts, legislation changes, and specialist knowledge are required to counter this growing issue. In Annabel Taylor's exploratory chapter, "Community and Stranger-Related Violence", definitions, prevalence and effects of this type of crime are discussed. Theoretical perspectives explaining stranger-related violence, policy, criminal justice system, and human service responses within New Zealand are also given consideration. The impacts on human service workers who encounter violence are analysed in the chapter entitled "Violence: The Personal and Professional Self", by Kate van Heugten. Here, the author conducts an examination of the importance of worker self-care and supportive organisational and policy structures. In the final chapter, "Family Violence: State and Community", Ken McMaster explores the roles, responsibilities and partnership between the state and community pertaining to anti-violence agendas, policies and initiatives. This chapter highlights the extent of family violence and the author asserts that there is still much that can be done to reduce its pervasiveness and benefit future generations.