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What works for children exposed to family violence?

Contributor(s): New Zealand. Superu.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleSeries: What works.Publisher: Wellington, New Zealand : Superu, 2017Description: electronic document (24 pages) ; PDF file: 992 KB.Subject(s): ADVERSE CHILDHOOD EXPERIENCES | CHILD ABUSE | CHILD EXPOSURE TO VIOLENCE | CHILDREN | FAMILY VIOLENCE | INTERVENTION | INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE | PARENTING | SUPPORT SERVICES | NEW ZEALANDOnline resources: Click here to access online | View video | Seminar presentations What works, June 2017Summary: This paper brings together evidence about the best interventions which make a positive difference to the lives of children exposed to family violence. The main highlight of this paper is that the harm caused by family violence exposure is just as harmful as the harm caused by direct abuse. ‘Exposure’ to family violence is damaging no matter whether the child sees, hears, is directly involved, or experiences the aftermath of violence in their family. This research aims to be useful for those people who develop policy or run support services for these children to keep themselves safe. Superu’s ‘What Works’ synthesis products answer complex questions on specific social issues and add to the evidence-base. (From the website). The video link provides an overview of the paper. Follow the other link for presentations (Powerpoint and video options) from the seminar held on 25 August 2017. Presenters: Bridget Burmester, Julia Hennessey, Dr Ainsleigh Cribb-Su'a and Panel discussion, with our three speakers and Dr Siale Foliaki. Record #5457
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What works, June 2017

This paper brings together evidence about the best interventions which make a positive difference to the lives of children exposed to family violence.

The main highlight of this paper is that the harm caused by family violence exposure is just as harmful as the harm caused by direct abuse. ‘Exposure’ to family violence is damaging no matter whether the child sees, hears, is directly involved, or experiences the aftermath of violence in their family.

This research aims to be useful for those people who develop policy or run support services for these children to keep themselves safe. Superu’s ‘What Works’ synthesis products answer complex questions on specific social issues and add to the evidence-base. (From the website). The video link provides an overview of the paper. Follow the other link for presentations (Powerpoint and video options) from the seminar held on 25 August 2017. Presenters: Bridget Burmester, Julia Hennessey, Dr Ainsleigh Cribb-Su'a and Panel discussion, with our three speakers and Dr Siale Foliaki. Record #5457

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