Normal view MARC view ISBD view

A systematic review of interventions for women parenting in the context of intimate partner violence Anna E. Austin, Meghan E. Shanahan, Yasmin V. Barrios, and Rebecca J. Macy

By: Austin, Anna E.
Contributor(s): Shanaham, Meghan E | Barrios, Yasmin V | Macy, Rebecca J.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleSubject(s): CHILD EXPOSURE TO VIOLENCE | DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | INTERVENTION | INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE | MOTHERS | PARENTING | PARENTING PROGRAMMES | SYSTEMATIC REVIEWS | UNITED STATESOnline resources: Read abstract In: Trauma, Violence & Abuse, 2017, Advance online publication, 21 July 2017Summary: "Intimate partner violence (IPV) victimization is widespread among women with children and has negative consequences for both women’s and children’s well-being. Despite mixed evidence regarding the effect of IPV on women’s parenting ability and behaviors, there is an increasing focus on mothering in the context of IPV, particularly among the child welfare and child protection systems. To help respond to this increasing focus, several interventions have been developed that specifically target parenting among IPV-affected women. Given the growing numbers of these interventions, a comprehensive review is needed to help elucidate the approaches that are most effective in meeting the needs of IPV-affected women and children. Therefore, we conducted an in-depth systematic review of the literature to examine the approaches and effects of interventions designed to address aspects of parenting among IPV-affected women. We identified 26 articles concerned with 19 distinct interventions for review. We found substantial heterogeneity in intervention delivery, format, length, and focus. We noted several limitations of the existing studies in terms of study sample, measures, design, and implementation. Given the heterogeneity of the existing interventions and the limitations of the current research base, it is not yet clear which interventions or intervention components are most effective in addressing the unique needs of women parenting in the context of IPV. Further research is needed to address these limitations, and professionals working with IPV-affected families should be aware that current services may not meet women’s and children’s needs." (Authors' abstract). Record #5547
No physical items for this record

Trauma, Violence & Abuse, 2017, Advance online publication, 21 July 2017

"Intimate partner violence (IPV) victimization is widespread among women with children and has negative consequences for both women’s and children’s well-being. Despite mixed evidence regarding the effect of IPV on women’s parenting ability and behaviors, there is an increasing focus on mothering in the context of IPV, particularly among the child welfare and child protection systems. To help respond to this increasing focus, several interventions have been developed that specifically target parenting among IPV-affected women. Given the growing numbers of these interventions, a comprehensive review is needed to help elucidate the approaches that are most effective in meeting the needs of IPV-affected women and children. Therefore, we conducted an in-depth systematic review of the literature to examine the approaches and effects of interventions designed to address aspects of parenting among IPV-affected women. We identified 26 articles concerned with 19 distinct interventions for review. We found substantial heterogeneity in intervention delivery, format, length, and focus. We noted several limitations of the existing studies in terms of study sample, measures, design, and implementation. Given the heterogeneity of the existing interventions and the limitations of the current research base, it is not yet clear which interventions or intervention components are most effective in addressing the unique needs of women parenting in the context of IPV. Further research is needed to address these limitations, and professionals working with IPV-affected families should be aware that current services may not meet women’s and children’s needs." (Authors' abstract). Record #5547