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I didn't put the oxygen mask on first but I came out alive : how women who have lived with intimate partner violence (IPV) talk about the interplay between their vulnerabilities and the decision to change their situation Mary Mendez

By: Mendez, Mary.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: 2017Description: electronic document (117 pages) ; PDF file: 2.01 MB.Other title: A research report submitted in partial fulfilment for the requirements of the degree of Master in Counselling, University of Auckland.Subject(s): ABUSED WOMEN | DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE | QUALITATIVE RESEARCH | SUPPORT SERVICES | THESES | VICTIMS OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | NEW ZEALANDOnline resources: Click here to access online Summary: This research explores experiences of women who have lived with intimate Partner Violence (IPV), and how their stories about the strengths, readiness and vulnerabilities play a part in the process of leaving a violent relationship. The research has been done using a qualitative thematic analysis approach, looking in depth at these women’s experiences and how they processed their situation. Six women have been interviewed, all of them discussing their experience of IPV. The interviews were done individually, and lasted between 1 and 1 ½ hours. These findings presented a variety of factors that influenced these women’s journey to leaving the abusive relationship. These factors were collated and summarised using four broad themes: 1. Precontemplation 2. Story of relationship 3. Failed attempts 4. Successful attempt The findings were consistent with previous research around IPV, especially around the need for information, support and a safe space for the survivor, to help build her confidence. However, the findings did not correspond well with the Stages of Change (SOC). It was proposed that the Barriers Model be used in conjunction with the SOC, as a foundation in understanding the survivor’s experience and situation to help her move through her journey to change and hopefully towards increased safety. I hope that the findings will guide counsellors, the women in these relationships, the support people of these women, nurses, GP’s and any others who connect or communicate with individuals in violent relationships so that they are better able to support them in a way that they need in their own personal journey. One recommendation is that there is a need for facilitating the creation of women’s support groups in the local community so that these women can build their own support networks, exchange ideas and share their stories so that they do not feel so alone. The journey a woman goes through to seek change in her relationship is often complicat ed and drawn out, the dynamics of information, having children, a safe space, a woman’s confidence, support woman’s strengths and vulnerabilities play a unique role in every survivor’s story. Key words: domestic violence, intimate partner violence, vulnerabilities, change, stages of change. (Author's abstract). Record #5664
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Research report (Master in Counselling), University of Auckland

This research explores experiences of women who have lived with intimate Partner Violence (IPV), and how their stories about the strengths, readiness and vulnerabilities play a part in the process of leaving a violent relationship. The research has been done using a qualitative thematic analysis approach, looking in depth at these women’s experiences and how they processed their situation. Six women have been interviewed, all of them discussing their experience of IPV. The interviews were done individually, and lasted between 1 and 1 ½ hours. These findings presented a variety of factors that influenced these women’s journey to leaving the abusive relationship. These factors were collated and summarised using four broad themes:
1. Precontemplation
2. Story of relationship
3. Failed attempts
4. Successful attempt
The findings were consistent with previous research around IPV, especially around the need for information, support and a safe space for the survivor, to help build her confidence. However, the findings did not correspond well with the Stages of Change (SOC). It was proposed that the Barriers Model be used in conjunction with the SOC, as a foundation in understanding the survivor’s experience and situation to help her move through her journey to change and hopefully towards increased safety.
I hope that the findings will guide counsellors, the women in these relationships, the support people of these women, nurses, GP’s and any others who connect or communicate with individuals in violent relationships so that they are better able to support them in a way that they need in their own personal journey. One recommendation is that there is a need for facilitating the creation of women’s support groups in the local community so that these women can build their own support networks, exchange ideas and share their stories so that they do not feel so alone. The journey a woman goes through to seek change in her relationship is often complicat ed and drawn out, the dynamics of information, having children, a safe space, a woman’s confidence, support woman’s strengths and vulnerabilities play a unique role in every survivor’s story.
Key words: domestic violence, intimate partner violence, vulnerabilities, change, stages of change. (Author's abstract). Record #5664