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Āwhinatia tāu Whānau: Kua Wehea ai, Kua Ngaro ai : Māori experiences of reconnecting and rebuilding relationships with kin-based systems of whānau, hapū and iwi Tania Gilchrist

By: Gilchrist, Tania.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: 2017Description: electronic document (191 pages) ; PDF file.Other title: A thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Clinical Psychology, University of Auckland.Subject(s): COLONISATION | FAMILIES | FAMILY VIOLENCE | HEALING | HISTORICAL TRAUMA | INTERGENERATIONAL VIOLENCE | INTERPERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS | MĀORI | MENTAL HEALTH | PSYCHOLOGICAL ASPECTS | HAPŪ | HAUORA HINENGARO | IWI | PĀMAMAE HEKE IHO | RANGAHAU MĀORI | RONGOĀ | TAIPŪWHENUATANGA | TIKANGA TUKU IHO | TŪKINOTANGA Ā-WHĀNAU | WHĀNAU | WHANAUNGATANGAOnline resources: Click here to access online Summary: Meaningful connection is an important contributor to individual wellness and resilience. As an Indigenous people, Māori are often considered whānau orientated and shaped by a broad kin-based network of relationships with whānau, hapū and iwi. However, a number of Māori are not able to connect with these potential systems of support. The aim of this research was to explore the issues surrounding whānau, hapū and iwi disconnection and the way that individuals and whānau rebuild and reconnect following a period of disconnection. Utilising a Kaupapa Māori methodology and Whakapapa Framework, fifteen semi-structured interviews were conducted with individuals who had experienced disconnection and subsequently begun a process of reconnection with whānau, hapū and iwi. Thematic analysis explored common patterns across all interviews and identified that the causes of disconnection are complex with historical, contemporary, and cross generational factors present. The experience of disconnection itself reflected alienation and longing for whakapapa characteristic of ngākau mamae, a loss of culture and relationships. Nevertheless, a number of enduring threads of connection were present in the form of wairuatanga, whakapapa kōrero and whenua. Thus the reconnection process was identified as a dynamic and complex interaction of simultaneous disconnection and connection in areas that strengthen and weaken at various stages of life. An active point of turning toward reconnection was identified. This then paved the way for further connection with whānau, hapū and iwi. Dealing with difficult dynamics was identified as a challenging aspect of the reconnection process. However, an acceptance of such realities and contradictions facilitated alternative pathways to reconnect and alongside the re-establishment of whānau tikanga facilitated safe interaction. Overall, the experience of reconnection was identified by participants as transformative and valuable. Reconnection to whānau, hapū and iwi facilitated an increase in self-reported wellbeing, and a sense of tūrangawaewae or a place to stand within whānau, hapū and iwi and Māori identity in general. This study highlighted that whakapapa remains important to a number of Māori, and that creating connection within clinical practice supports Māori to articulate their experience and be supported in their identity as Māori. An increased awareness of the dynamics of disconnection and reconnection processes will likely facilitate a more robust cultural formulation, and consequently more culturally responsive intervention within psychological treatment for Māori, who present with issues that may involve a sense of disconnection from whānau, hapū and iwi. (Author's abstract). Record #5671
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Thesis (Doctor of Clinical Psychology), University of Auckland.

Meaningful connection is an important contributor to individual wellness and resilience. As an Indigenous people, Māori are often considered whānau orientated and shaped by a broad kin-based network of relationships with whānau, hapū and iwi. However, a number of Māori are not able to connect with these potential systems of support. The aim of this research was to explore the issues surrounding whānau, hapū and iwi disconnection and the way that individuals and whānau rebuild and reconnect following a period of disconnection. Utilising a Kaupapa Māori methodology and Whakapapa Framework, fifteen semi-structured interviews were conducted with individuals who had experienced disconnection and subsequently begun a process of reconnection with whānau, hapū and iwi. Thematic analysis explored common patterns across all interviews and identified that the causes of disconnection are complex with historical, contemporary, and cross generational factors present. The experience of disconnection itself reflected alienation and longing for whakapapa characteristic of ngākau mamae, a loss of culture and relationships. Nevertheless, a number of enduring threads of connection were present in the form of wairuatanga, whakapapa kōrero and whenua. Thus the reconnection process was identified as a dynamic and complex interaction of simultaneous disconnection and connection in areas that strengthen and weaken at various stages of life. An active point of turning toward reconnection was identified. This then paved the way for further connection with whānau, hapū and iwi. Dealing with difficult dynamics was identified as a challenging aspect of the reconnection process. However, an acceptance of such realities and contradictions facilitated alternative pathways to reconnect and alongside the re-establishment of whānau tikanga facilitated safe interaction. Overall, the experience of reconnection was identified by participants as transformative and valuable. Reconnection to whānau, hapū and iwi facilitated an increase in self-reported wellbeing, and a sense of tūrangawaewae or a place to stand within whānau, hapū and iwi and Māori identity in general. This study highlighted that whakapapa remains important to a number of Māori, and that creating connection within clinical practice supports Māori to articulate their experience and be supported in their identity as Māori. An increased awareness of the dynamics of disconnection and reconnection processes will likely facilitate a more robust cultural formulation, and consequently more culturally responsive intervention within psychological treatment for Māori, who present with issues that may involve a sense of disconnection from whānau, hapū and iwi. (Author's abstract). Record #5671