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Doing and denying sexism : online responses to a New Zealand feminist campaign against sexist advertising Paulette Benton-Greig, Dhakshi Gamage and Nicola Gavey

By: Benton-Greig, Paulette.
Contributor(s): Gamage, Dhakshi | Gavey, Nicola.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleSeries: Feminist Media Studies.Publisher: Taylor & Francis, 2017Subject(s): ADVERTISING | ATTITUDES | FEMINISM | GENDER | ONLINE HARASSMENT | SEXISM | SOCIAL MEDIA | NEW ZEALANDOnline resources: Read abstract In: Feminist Media Studies, 2017, Advance online publication (18 pages)Summary: In 2012 a New Zealand feminist group launched a campaign against a series of local beer advertisements they deemed “retro-sexist.” The campaign generated media coverage across a range of viewpoints, but drew a largely negative response from the online public. This article analyses a comprehensive corpus of 753 online comments responding to news of the campaign. We discuss the dominant discursive constructions of gender and of feminists, and the ways these were deployed to trivialise the campaign, demonise the feminist campaigners, and depoliticise the issues. The comments overall, ironically, simultaneously disavow and perform sexism in this online public space. This imbrication of the denial and doing of sexism creates a hostile reception for public feminist voices, potentially dampening the field of possibility for action against sexism within mediated culture. (Authors' abstract). Record #5675
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Feminist Media Studies, 2017, Advance online publication (18 pages)

In 2012 a New Zealand feminist group launched a campaign against a series of local beer advertisements they deemed “retro-sexist.” The campaign generated media coverage across a range of viewpoints, but drew a largely negative response from the online public. This article analyses a comprehensive corpus of 753 online comments responding to news of the campaign. We discuss the dominant discursive constructions of gender and of feminists, and the ways these were deployed to trivialise the campaign, demonise the feminist campaigners, and depoliticise the issues. The comments overall, ironically, simultaneously disavow and perform sexism in this online public space. This imbrication of the denial and doing of sexism creates a hostile reception for public feminist voices, potentially dampening the field of possibility for action against sexism within mediated culture. (Authors' abstract). Record #5675