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The Family Matters report 2017 : measuring trends to turn the tide on the over-representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in out-of-home care in Australia Family Matters: Natalie Lewis (National Co-Chair); SNAICC – National Voice for our Children: John Burton, Peter Lewis, Joanne Lau, Claire Stacey, Emma Sydenham and Fleur Smith; Griffith University (School of Human Services and Social Work): Clare Tilbury, Tracey Smith University of Melbourne (Department of Social Work): Aron Shlonsky, Arno Parolini, and Wei Wu Tan

By: Lewis, Natalie.
Contributor(s): SNAICC - National Voice for Our Children | Family Matters | Griffith University. School of Human Services and Social Work | University of Melbourne. Department of Social Work.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Family Matters, 2017Description: electronic document (84 pages) ; PDF file.Subject(s): ABORIGINAL & TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER PEOPLES | CARE AND PROTECTION | CHILDREN | FOSTER CARE | INDIGENOUS PEOPLES | STATISTICS | YOUNG PEOPLE | AUSTRALIAOnline resources: Click here to access online | Access the website Summary: Family Matters reports set out what governments are doing to turn the tide on the over-representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in OOHC, and the outcomes for children and their families. The reports contribute to efforts to change the story by explaining the extent of the problem and reporting on progress towards implementing evidence-informed solutions that aim to eliminate, within a generation, the over-representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children living away from their parents and families in statutory OOHC. The report considers government efforts across all five elements of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Child Placement Principle: prevention, partnership, participation, placement and connection. These elements are discussed with a particular focus on strategies and progress relating to policies, practices and investments that are likely to drive early intervention and prevention to work with families to enable them to care safely for their children, and to keep children connected to their family, community, culture and country. Understanding and applying all five elements recognises that they are inter-related and work together to achieve the Family Matters campaign goal of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children growing up safe and cared for in family, community, and culture. (From the introduction). Record #5699
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Family Matters reports set out what governments are doing to turn the tide on the over-representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in OOHC, and the outcomes for children and their families. The reports contribute to efforts to change the story
by explaining the extent of the problem and reporting on progress towards implementing evidence-informed solutions that aim to eliminate, within a generation, the over-representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children living away from their parents and families in statutory OOHC.

The report considers government efforts across all five elements of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Child Placement Principle: prevention, partnership, participation, placement and connection. These elements are discussed with a particular focus on strategies and progress relating to policies, practices and investments that are likely to drive early intervention and prevention to work with families to enable them to care safely for their children, and to keep children connected to their family, community, culture and country. Understanding and applying all five elements recognises that they are inter-related and work together to achieve the Family Matters campaign goal of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children growing up safe and cared for in family, community, and culture. (From the introduction). Record #5699

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