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Comparing help-seeking behavior of male and female survivors of sexual assault : a content analysis of a hotline Stephen M. Young, Jane A. Pruett and Marianna L. Colvin

By: Young, Stephen M.
Contributor(s): Pruett, Jane A | Colvin, Marianna L.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleSeries: Sexual Abuse.Publisher: Sage, 2018Subject(s): SEXUAL VIOLENCE | ABUSED MEN | ABUSEDD WOMEN | HELP SEEKING | HELPLINES | INTERVENTION | RAPE | SUPPORT SERVICES | UNITED STATESOnline resources: Read abstract In: Sexual Abuse, 2018, 30(4): 454-474Summary: This content analysis examines written documentation of telephone calls to a regional sexual assault hotline over a 5-year period. All male callers identified as primary victims were selected for analysis (n = 58) and a corresponding sample of female primary victims (n = 58) were randomly selected for comparison to better understand the help-seeking behavior of sexual assault survivors and inform services accordingly. A summative content analysis revealed significant contrasting themes between male and female victims, including females significantly receiving more referrals and males accessing the hotline to tell their experience of being sexually assaulted due to perceived limited support. Implications for training, practice, and future research are discussed. (Authors' abstract). Record #5826
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Sexual Abuse, 2018, 30(4): 454-474

This content analysis examines written documentation of telephone calls to a regional sexual assault hotline over a 5-year period. All male callers identified as primary victims were selected for analysis (n = 58) and a corresponding sample of female primary victims (n = 58) were randomly selected for comparison to better understand the help-seeking behavior of sexual assault survivors and inform services accordingly. A summative content analysis revealed significant contrasting themes between male and female victims, including females significantly receiving more referrals and males accessing the hotline to tell their experience of being sexually assaulted due to perceived limited support. Implications for training, practice, and future research are discussed. (Authors' abstract). Record #5826