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Family justice reforms : an initial cohort analysis Ministry of Justice

Contributor(s): New Zealand. Ministry of Justice.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Wellington, New Zealand : Ministry of Justice, 2017Description: electronic document (50 pages) ; PDF file.Subject(s): CARE OF CHILDREN ACT 2004 | CHILD WELFARE | DATA ANALYSIS | DISPUTE RESOLUTION | FAMILY COURT | FAMILY DISPUTE RESOLUTION | JUSTICE | PARENTS | SEPARATION | NEW ZEALANDOnline resources: Click here to access online | Access the webpage Summary: In 2014, major changes were made to the Family Justice System. The Family Justice System reforms shifted the focus from court resolution of parenting disputes when parents separate to encouraging parents to reach agreement themselves where this is appropriate. The reforms were intended to achieve a modern and accessible Family Justice System that: “is responsive to the needs of children and vulnerable people; encourages individual responsibility, where appropriate; is efficient and effective” The main change of the reforms was a portfolio of services to resolve disputes that families could access without entering the court system, known as out-of-court services, which included Family Dispute Resolution (FDR), the Parenting Through Separation (PTS) programme and Family Legal Advice (FLAS). The Family Court, known as in-court services, was just one part of a wider Family Justice System. This review tracks a cohort of people who entered the Family Justice System after the reforms and evaluates the efficiency and effectiveness of in- and out-of-court services by comparing pre-and post-reforms cohort outcomes; specifically, the proportion of people on each pathway in the Family Justice System; time taken for people to move through each pathway; outcomes for people in each pathway. (From the Executive summary). More reports relating to the 2014 Family Court reforms can be found on the webpage. Record #5829
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In 2014, major changes were made to the Family Justice System. The Family Justice System reforms shifted the focus from court resolution of parenting disputes when parents separate to encouraging parents to reach agreement themselves where this is appropriate.

The reforms were intended to achieve a modern and accessible Family Justice System that:
“is responsive to the needs of children and vulnerable people; encourages individual responsibility, where appropriate; is efficient and effective”

The main change of the reforms was a portfolio of services to resolve disputes that families could access without entering the court system, known as out-of-court services, which included Family Dispute Resolution (FDR), the Parenting Through Separation (PTS) programme and
Family Legal Advice (FLAS). The Family Court, known as in-court services, was just one part of a wider Family Justice System.

This review tracks a cohort of people who entered the Family Justice System after the reforms and evaluates the efficiency and effectiveness of in- and out-of-court services by comparing pre-and post-reforms cohort outcomes; specifically, the proportion of people on each pathway in the Family Justice System; time taken for people to move through each pathway; outcomes for people in each pathway. (From the Executive summary). More reports relating to the 2014 Family Court reforms can be found on the webpage. Record #5829