Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Masculine norms and violence : making the connections Brian Heilman and Gary Barker

By: Heilman, Brian.
Contributor(s): Barker, Gary.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Washington, DC : Promundo-US, 2018Description: electronic document (97 pages) ; PDF file.Subject(s): SEXUAL VIOLENCE | CHILD ABUSE | CHILD SEXUAL ABUSE | Oak Foundation | ATTITUDES | BULLYING | DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | HOMICIDE | INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE | MASCULINITY | MEN | PRIMARY PREVENTION | SUICIDE | VIOLENCE | YOUNG MEN | UNITED STATESOnline resources: Click here to access online Summary: Te Tiriti o Waitangi (te Tiriti) legitimises settler presence in Aotearoa New Zealand and governance by the British Crown. Therefore, te Tiriti must lie at the heart of ethical health promotion in this country. This resource, inspired by activist scholarship, explores the ways in which senior health promoters work with the articles of te Tiriti and its aspirations. The research question was: How do senior health promoters apply the articles of te Tiriti to practice? This question emerged out of dialogue with members of the health activist network STIR – Stop Institutional Racism. STIR (Came, McCreanor, & Simpson, 2016) is a group of senior public health practitioners and activist researchers who aim to end racism in the public health sector. The promotion of te Tiriti-based practice is a promising pathway to counter institutional racism in Aotearoa (Came & McCreanor, 2015). The resource aims to refresh and extend the important work of the Health Promotion Forum (2000) in the development of Treaty Understanding of Hauora in Aotearoa-New Zealand (TUHA-NZ) – the pioneering Tiriti-based practice guidelines. (From the introduction). Record #5843
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Access online Access online Online Available ON18050010

Te Tiriti o Waitangi (te Tiriti) legitimises settler presence in Aotearoa New Zealand and governance by the British Crown. Therefore, te Tiriti must lie at the heart of ethical health promotion in this country. This resource, inspired by activist scholarship, explores the ways in which senior health promoters work with the articles of te Tiriti and its aspirations. The research question was: How do senior health promoters apply the articles of te Tiriti to practice?

This question emerged out of dialogue with members of the health activist network STIR – Stop Institutional Racism. STIR (Came, McCreanor, & Simpson, 2016) is a group of senior public health practitioners and activist researchers who aim to end racism in the public health sector. The promotion of te Tiriti-based practice is a promising pathway to counter institutional racism in Aotearoa (Came & McCreanor, 2015). The resource aims to refresh and extend the important work of the Health Promotion Forum (2000) in the development of Treaty Understanding of Hauora in Aotearoa-New Zealand (TUHA-NZ) – the pioneering Tiriti-based practice guidelines. (From the introduction). Record #5843