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Māori social workers' experiences of care and protection : Paora Moyle a selection of findings

By: Moyle, Paora.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleSeries: Aotearoa New Zealand Social Work.Publisher: Aotearoa New Zealand Association of Social Workers 2014Description: electronic document (10 pages) ; PDF file: 489 KB.Subject(s): FAMILY VIOLENCE | TŪKINOTANGA Ā-WHĀNAU | PATU TAMARIKI | CHILD ABUSE | CHILD PROTECTION | CULTURAL ISSUES | FAMILY GROUP CONFERENCES | MĀORI | SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE | RANGAHAU MĀORI | TIKANGA TUKU IHO | TOKO I TE ORA | WHĀNAU | NEW ZEALANDOnline resources: Click here to access online In: Aotearoa New Zealand Social Work, 2014, 26(1): 55-64Summary: This article explores the challenges faced by seven Māori social workers who are also members of Aotearoa New Zealand Association of Social Workers (ANZASW) working within the child protection system in Aotearoa. Their views on what has improved for Māori whānau around recent legislation changes to family group conferencing (FGC) and newer policy initiatives such as Whānau Ora are examined. The study used a Māori-centred research approach and a thematic analysis of participants’ accounts was undertaken. From this analysis it was found that: (a) the participants walked creatively between two world views in order to best meet the needs of their own people; (b) these Māori practitioners felt over-worked and under-valued; and (c) the participants viewed the practices within FGCs as biased, demonstrating a lack of bicultural ability and contributing to significant barriers that whānau Māori experience in care and protection. (Author's abstract). Record #5842
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Aotearoa New Zealand Social Work, 2014, 26(1): 55-64

This article explores the challenges faced by seven Māori social workers who are also members of Aotearoa New Zealand Association of Social Workers (ANZASW) working within the child protection system in Aotearoa. Their views on what has improved for Māori whānau around recent legislation changes to family group conferencing (FGC) and newer policy initiatives such as Whānau Ora are examined. The study used a Māori-centred research approach and a thematic analysis of participants’ accounts was undertaken. From this analysis it was found that: (a) the participants walked creatively between two world views in order to best meet the needs of their own people; (b) these Māori practitioners felt over-worked and under-valued; and (c) the participants viewed the practices within FGCs as biased, demonstrating a lack of bicultural ability and contributing to significant barriers that whānau Māori experience in care and protection. (Author's abstract). Record #5842