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Challenges of operationalizing trauma‐informed practice in child protection services in New Zealand Nicola Atwool

By: Atwool, Nicola.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleSeries: Child & Family Social work.Publisher: Wiley, 2018Subject(s): PATU TAMARIKI | CHILD ABUSE | Oranga Tamariki, Ministry for Children | CHILD PROTECTION | HISTORICAL TRAUMA | INTERVENTION | MĀORI | SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE | SOCIAL SERVICES | TRAUMA | PĀMAMAE HEKE IHO | TOKO I TE ORA | NEW ZEALANDOnline resources: Read abstract In: Child & Family Social Work, 2018, Advance online publication, 16 May 2018Summary: New Zealand is undergoing major change in service delivery to children and families. A new Ministry for Children Oranga Tamariki has been established to oversee 5 work streams, one of which provides intensive intervention with families requiring a statutory response to child protection concerns. The government minister responsible promised that the service would be child‐centred and trauma‐informed. To date, these terms remain undefined, and there is no shared understanding of their meaning. Practice frameworks to support the work of the new ministry are still being developed, creating something of a vacuum in the meantime. The focus of this paper is the challenge of implementing trauma‐informed practice in the child protection service provided by the Intensive Intervention work stream. Limited research or commentary on trauma‐informed practice in this context currently exists. Drawing on the relevant available literature, the concept and its application in child protection social work is explored. An ecological framework is used to discuss the changes needed to achieve this. Particular attention is paid to the impact of historical trauma for indigenous people due to New Zealand's colonial history and their over‐representation in care and protection services. (Author's abstract). Record #5852
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Child & Family Social Work, 2018, Advance online publication, 16 May 2018

New Zealand is undergoing major change in service delivery to children and families. A new Ministry for Children Oranga Tamariki has been established to oversee 5 work streams, one of which provides intensive intervention with families requiring a statutory response to child protection concerns. The government minister responsible promised that the service would be child‐centred and trauma‐informed. To date, these terms remain undefined, and there is no shared understanding of their meaning. Practice frameworks to support the work of the new ministry are still being developed, creating something of a vacuum in the meantime. The focus of this paper is the challenge of implementing trauma‐informed practice in the child protection service provided by the Intensive Intervention work stream. Limited research or commentary on trauma‐informed practice in this context currently exists. Drawing on the relevant available literature, the concept and its application in child protection social work is explored. An ecological framework is used to discuss the changes needed to achieve this. Particular attention is paid to the impact of historical trauma for indigenous people due to New Zealand's colonial history and their over‐representation in care and protection services. (Author's abstract). Record #5852