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It’s never too early, never too late : a discussion paper on preventing youth offending in New Zealand Office of the Prime Minister's Chief Science Advisor

By: Gluckman, Peter D.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Wellington, New Zealand : Office of the Prime Minister's Chief Science Advisor, 2018Description: electronic document (41 pages) ; PDF file.Subject(s): FAMILY VIOLENCE | CHILD ABUSE | CHILD EXPOSURE TO VIOLENCE | CHILD PROTECTION | CHILDREN OF PRISONERS | CRIME | GANGS | INTERVENTION | JUSTICE | MĀORI | PACIFIC PEOPLE | PARENTING | PASIFIKA | PRISONERS | SCHOOLS | YOUNG OFFENDERS | YOUNG PEOPLEOnline resources: Click here to access online Summary: This paper first briefly overviews the pattern of crime involving under-25-year-olds; reflects on issues for victims; and explores the concept of developmental crime prevention. The entry pathways into the prison pipeline (from intergenerational issues to risk factors associated with early offending) are described. Early intervention approaches are highlighted; that is, ways to make changes across the life-course and across systems (using many already available programmes in New Zealand but often not adequately or appropriately applied). The “exit” pathway, of getting those who have begun some engagement with the criminal-justice system, away from further engagement, is touched on briefly, if only to highlight that it is never too late to make a difference. Primarily, this is a discussion paper (not a service audit nor an exhaustive literature review), aimed at raising findings from current science to prompt informed reflection and discussion on the justice issues we face as a country. (From the introduction). This is the second paper from the OPMCSA addressing issues facing the justice system (see # 5817). Record #5871
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This paper first briefly overviews the pattern of crime involving under-25-year-olds; reflects on issues for victims; and explores the concept of developmental crime prevention. The entry pathways into the prison pipeline (from intergenerational issues to risk factors associated with early offending) are described. Early intervention approaches are highlighted; that is, ways to make changes across the life-course and across systems (using many already available programmes in New Zealand but often not adequately or appropriately applied). The “exit” pathway, of getting those who have begun some engagement with the criminal-justice system, away from further engagement, is touched on briefly, if only to highlight that it is never too
late to make a difference. Primarily, this is a discussion paper (not a service audit nor an exhaustive literature review), aimed at raising findings from current science to prompt informed reflection and discussion on the justice issues we face as a country. (From the introduction). This is the second paper from the OPMCSA addressing issues facing the justice system (see # 5817). Record #5871