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A Pacific perspective on the Living Standards Framework and wellbeing Su'a Thomsen and Jez Tavita

By: Thomsen, Su'a.
Contributor(s): Tavita, Jez.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Living Standards Series: Discussion Paper.Publisher: Wellington, New Zealand : New Zealand Treasury, 2018Description: electronic document (40 pages) ; PDF file ; HTML version available.ISBN: 978-1-98-855663-5.Subject(s): New Zealand. Treasury | CULTURE | ECONOMIC ANALYSIS | GOVERNMENT POLICY | Living Standards Framework | PACIFIC PEOPLES | PASIFIKA | SOCIAL POLICY | WELLBEING | NEW ZEALANDOnline resources: Click here to access online | Living Standards Framework Living Standards Series: Discussion Paper, 18/09, August 2018Summary: This paper has been prepared by the Treasury recognising the growing influence and impact of the Pacific diaspora and intergenerational population on the New Zealand economy and on New Zealand's place in the wider Pacific region. The Treasury appreciates that there is not a “generic ‘Pacific community' but rather Pacific peoples who align themselves variously, and at different times along ethnic, geographic, church, family, school, age/gender, island-born, New Zealand born, occupational lines or a mix of these” (Anae, Coxon, & Mara, 2001)[1] Despite some cultural differences, Pacific cultures share many commonalities. This paper focuses on the commonalities Pacific New Zealanders share rather than the differences. The metaphoric model that we refer to in this paper, “Fonofale”, has been deliberately chosen to express the Pacific concepts of wellbeing and “wellness”. This model highlights “family” as the foundation for all Pacific peoples, and “culture” the overarching element under which all important aspects to Pacific peoples are created and maintained, including values and belief systems. This paper suggests that any framework for describing and understanding Pacific peoples must highlight family as the dominant relationship that Pacific peoples acquire from birth, and highlight the key influence that culture plays in the social, human and physical capital stocks of Pacific New Zealanders. (From the Executive summary). One in the series of discussion papers related to the Treasury approach to the Living Standards Framework - follow the link for more information. Record #5957
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Living Standards Series: Discussion Paper, 18/09, August 2018

This paper has been prepared by the Treasury recognising the growing influence and impact of the Pacific diaspora and intergenerational population on the New Zealand economy and on New Zealand's place in the wider Pacific region.

The Treasury appreciates that there is not a “generic ‘Pacific community' but rather Pacific peoples who align themselves variously, and at different times along ethnic, geographic, church, family, school, age/gender, island-born, New Zealand born, occupational lines or a mix of these” (Anae, Coxon, & Mara, 2001)[1] Despite some cultural differences, Pacific cultures share many commonalities. This paper focuses on the commonalities Pacific New Zealanders share rather than the differences.

The metaphoric model that we refer to in this paper, “Fonofale”, has been deliberately chosen to express the Pacific concepts of wellbeing and “wellness”. This model highlights “family” as the foundation for all Pacific peoples, and “culture” the overarching element under which all important aspects to Pacific peoples are created and maintained, including values and belief systems. This paper suggests that any framework for describing and understanding Pacific peoples must highlight family as the dominant relationship that Pacific peoples acquire from birth, and highlight the key influence that culture plays in the social, human and physical capital stocks of Pacific New Zealanders. (From the Executive summary).

One in the series of discussion papers related to the Treasury approach to the Living Standards Framework - follow the link for more information. Record #5957