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Understanding recovery from a family perspective : a survey of life in recovery for families Catrin Andersson, David Best, Jamie Irving, Michael Edwards, James Banks, Adam Mama-Rudd and Rebecca Hamer

By: Andersson, Catrin.
Contributor(s): Best, David | Irving, Jamie | Edwards, Michael | Banks, James | Mama-Rudd, Adam | Hamer, Rebecca.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: London : Alcohol Research UK, 2018Description: electronic document (74 pages) ; PDF file.Subject(s): FAMILY VIOLENCE | ALCOHOL ABUSE | ALCOHOL-RELATED HARM | CHILDREN | FAMILIES | PERPETRATORS | VICTIMS OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | UNITED KINGDOMOnline resources: Click here to access online Summary: A growing body of research describes how the lives of dependent drinkers can change as they move from active addiction to recovery. The Life in Recovery surveys in the US, UK, Australia, Canada and South Africa all reveal marked improvements in physical and psychological health, family functioning, employment and education, reductions in crime and community engagement (Best, 2014; Best et al, 2015). However, no surveys have, until now, assessed the experience of recovery from the perspective of family members. For family members, recovery is experienced in two senses. They observe the journey of the recovering drinker; however, they also embark on their own journey of change as a consequence of their experiences. The work presented here attempts to describe both aspects. (Executive summary). A 4-page summary (Alcohol Insight) is also available. Record #5964
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Research conducted by the Helena Kennedy Centre for International Justice (HKC), Sheffield Hallam University.

A growing body of research describes how the lives of dependent drinkers can change as they move from active addiction to recovery. The Life in Recovery surveys in the US, UK, Australia, Canada and South Africa all reveal marked improvements in
physical and psychological health, family functioning, employment and education,
reductions in crime and community engagement (Best, 2014; Best et al, 2015). However, no surveys have, until now, assessed the experience of recovery from the perspective of family members.

For family members, recovery is experienced in two senses. They observe the journey of the recovering drinker; however, they also embark on their own journey of change
as a consequence of their experiences. The work presented here attempts to describe both aspects. (Executive summary). A 4-page summary (Alcohol Insight) is also available. Record #5964