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They're our whānau : a community-powered and collaborative research report on Māori perspectives of New Zealand's justice system ActionStation

Contributor(s): ActionStation.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: ActionStation, 2018Description: electronic document (33 pages) ; PDF file. HTML version available.Subject(s): ATTITUDES | COLONISATION | CRIMINAL JUSTICE | INTERGENERATIONAL TRANSMISSION | INTERGENERATIONAL TRAUMA | INTERVENTION | INSTITUTIONAL VIOLENCE | MĀORI | MEDIA | OFFENDERS | RACISM | QUALITATIVE RESEARCH | VIOLENCE | AO PĀPĀHO | PĀMAMAE HEKE IHO | PŪNAHA TURE TAIHARA | RANGAHAU MĀORI | TAIPŪWHENUATANGA | TANGATA HARA | TIKANGA TUKU IHO | TŪKINOTANGA | WHAKAHĀWEA IWIOnline resources: Click here to access online Summary: This research was conducted by ActionStation and supported by fourth year medical students from the University of Otago in Wellington under the supervision of Māori public health researcher Dr Keri Lawson-Te Aho and Director of ActionStation Laura O’Connell Rapira. It was conducted between July and September 2018 in four main ways: online survey, expert interviews, a literature review and attendance of the Safe and Effective Justice Summit. They’re Our Whānau is a collaborative research project that compiles the perspectives of over 900 Māori participants. (From the Executive summary). Record #5982
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This research was conducted by ActionStation and supported by fourth year medical students from the University of Otago in Wellington under the supervision of Māori public health researcher Dr Keri Lawson-Te Aho and Director of ActionStation Laura O’Connell Rapira. It was conducted between July and September 2018 in four main ways: online survey, expert interviews, a literature review and attendance of the Safe and Effective Justice Summit.

They’re Our Whānau is a collaborative research project that compiles the perspectives of over 900 Māori participants. (From the Executive summary). Record #5982