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Understanding domestic violence incidents using crime script analysis Hayley Boxall, Chloe Boyd, Christopher Dowling and Anthony Morgan

By: Boxall, Hayley.
Contributor(s): Boyd, Chloe | Dowling, Christopher | Morgan, Anthony.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleSeries: Trends & Issues in Crime and Criminal Justice.Publisher: Canberra, ACT : Australian Institute of Criminology, 2018Description: electronic document (21 pages): PDF file.ISSN: 0817-8542.Subject(s): ALCOHOL-RELATED HARM | DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | INTERVENTION | INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE | QUALITATIVE RESEARCH | VICTIMS OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | AUSTRALIAOnline resources: Click here to access online Trends & Issues in Crime and Criminal Justice, no. 558, August 2018Summary: Finding ways to reduce repeat domestic violence requires an understanding of both violent relationships and what happens during violent incidents. The current study uses crime script analysis to describe incidents of men’s violence against women. The results provide new insights into the situational factors present when arguments escalate to violence. These findings highlight the important role of third parties (eg friends and other family members) and the potential for bystander intervention. They also show the significance of emotion and intoxication. The ability of police to de-escalate violence is highlighted. Most importantly, the findings illustrate how crime script analysis can be applied to domestic violence to help identify ways to intervene to prevent repeat violence and reduce harm to victims. (Authors' abstract). Record #5990
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Trends & Issues in Crime and Criminal Justice, no. 558, August 2018

Finding ways to reduce repeat domestic violence requires an understanding of both violent relationships and what happens during violent incidents. The current study uses crime script analysis to describe incidents of men’s violence against women.

The results provide new insights into the situational factors present when arguments escalate to violence.

These findings highlight the important role of third parties (eg friends and other family members) and the potential for bystander intervention. They also show the significance of emotion and intoxication. The ability of police to de-escalate violence is highlighted.

Most importantly, the findings illustrate how crime script analysis can be applied to domestic violence to help identify ways to intervene to prevent repeat violence and reduce harm to victims. (Authors' abstract). Record #5990