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Who reports domestic violence to police? Isabella Voce and Hayley Boxalla review of the evidence

By: Voce, Isabella.
Contributor(s): Boxall, Hayley.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleSeries: Trends & Issues in Crime and Criminal Justice.Publisher: Canberra, ACT : Australian Institute of Criminology, 2018Description: electronic document (16 pages): PDF file.ISSN: 0817-8542.Subject(s): DISCLOSURE | DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | ETHNICITY | HELP SEEKING | INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE | LITERATURE REVIEWS | PHYSICAL ABUSE | POLICE | VICTIMS OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | AUSTRALIAOnline resources: Click here to access online Trends & Issues in Crime and Criminal Justice, no. 559, September 2018Summary: The police play an important role in the management of immediate harm and risk associated with domestic violence. However, the hidden nature of domestic violence incidents means that the involvement of police is dependent on a report being made. Set against the backdrop of increasing levels of reporting of domestic violence in Australia, the current study analysed 21 Australian and international quantitative studies of victim self report data to identify factors associated with victim reporting of domestic violence to police. The analysis found that victims who are female, non-white, experiencing frequent violence and who have been abused in the past are more likely to report. Incidents that involve serious violence, an intoxicated offender and/or child witnesses are also more likely to be reported to the police. (Authors' abstract). Record #5991
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Trends & Issues in Crime and Criminal Justice, no. 559, September 2018

The police play an important role in the management of
immediate harm and risk associated with domestic violence. However, the hidden nature of domestic violence incidents means that the involvement of police is dependent on a report being made.

Set against the backdrop of increasing levels of reporting of domestic violence in Australia, the current study analysed 21 Australian and international quantitative studies of victim self report data to identify factors associated with victim reporting of domestic violence to police.

The analysis found that victims who are female, non-white, experiencing frequent violence and who have been abused in the past are more likely to report. Incidents that involve serious violence, an intoxicated offender and/or child witnesses are also more likely to be reported to the police. (Authors' abstract). Record #5991