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When saying no is not an option : forced marriage in Australia and New Zealand Samantha Lyneham and Samantha Bricknell

By: Lyneham, Samantha.
Contributor(s): Bricknell, Samantha.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: AIC Research report.Publisher: Canberra, ACT : Australian Institute of Criminology, 2018Description: electronic document (115 pages) ; PDF file.ISSN: 2206-7280.Subject(s): ABUSED WOMEN | AFRICAN PEOPLES | ASIAN PEOPLES | CONSENT | CULTURAL ISSUES | DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | ECONOMIC ABUSE | HELP SEEKING | INTERVENTION | INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE | JUSTICE | MARRIAGE | MIGRANTS | PACIFIC PEOPLES | PASIFIKA | PHYSICAL ABUSE | SEXUAL VIOLENCE | SLAVERY | SOCIAL SERVICES | SUPPORT SERVICES | VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN | AFRICA | ASIA | AUSTRALIA | NEW ZEALAND | PACIFIC ISLANDSOnline resources: Click here to access online AIC Research report, no. 11, 2018Summary: As the world continues to develop better understandings of human trafficking and slavery in modern times, different manifestations of these practices are coming to light. Indeed, human trafficking and slavery continue to affect Australia and the Asia-Pacific region in more clandestine and insidious ways than might have been anticipated. This report addresses forced marriage, a slavery-like practice that has gained increasing attention in Australia and New Zealand since 2010 but has yet to form the focus of primary research that documents the experiences, decisions, views, and recommendations of victim/survivors and of the stakeholders that have engaged with them. The lack of data on the nature and context of forced marriage in Australia and New Zealand and on the potential consequences, both positive and negative, of criminalising this practice has resulted in insufficient evidence to support prevention and response mechanisms. This research therefore intends to provide policymakers, practitioners, and support providers with comprehensive knowledge about the problem as it affects both countries. The research had three primary objectives: - to explore perceptions and realities around forced marriage in Australia and New Zealand; - to describe the potential consequences of criminalising forced marriage; and - to review and identify where further policy development may be required to support the sectors and individuals impacted by this legislation. To address these objectives, thematic analyses of information derived from interviews with stakeholders (24 interviews with 38 participants), focus groups with stakeholders and community members (5 focus groups with 47 participants), interviews with victim/survivors (6 interviews with 7 participants) and victim/survivor case files (n=10) were conducted. (From the Executive summary). Record #5992
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AIC Research report, no. 11, 2018

As the world continues to develop better understandings of human trafficking and slavery in modern times, different manifestations of these practices are coming to light. Indeed, human trafficking and slavery continue to affect Australia and the Asia-Pacific region in more clandestine and insidious ways than might have been anticipated. This report addresses forced marriage, a slavery-like practice that has gained increasing attention in Australia and New Zealand since 2010 but has yet to form the focus of primary research that documents the experiences, decisions, views, and recommendations of victim/survivors and of the stakeholders that have engaged with them.

The lack of data on the nature and context of forced marriage in Australia and New Zealand and on the potential consequences, both positive and negative, of criminalising this practice has resulted in insufficient evidence to support prevention and response mechanisms. This research therefore intends to provide policymakers, practitioners, and support providers with comprehensive knowledge about the problem as it affects both countries.

The research had three primary objectives:
- to explore perceptions and realities around forced marriage in Australia and New Zealand;
- to describe the potential consequences of criminalising forced marriage; and - to review and identify where further policy development may be required to support the sectors and individuals impacted by this legislation.

To address these objectives, thematic analyses of information derived from interviews with stakeholders (24 interviews with 38 participants), focus groups with stakeholders and community members (5 focus groups with 47 participants), interviews with victim/survivors (6 interviews with 7 participants) and victim/survivor case files (n=10) were conducted. (From the Executive summary). Record #5992