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How can we improve the health systems response to reproductive coercion in the Australian context? Laura Tarzia

By: Tarzia, Laura.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Safer Families Centre for Research Excellence Discussion paper.Publisher: Melbourne, Vic : Safer Families Centre of Research Excellence, University of Melbourne, 2018Description: electronic document (7 pages) ; PDF file.Subject(s): ABORTION | COERCIVE CONTROL | CONTRACEPTION | DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | INTERVENTION | INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE | PREGNANCY | REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH | SEXUAL VIOLENCE | AUSTRALIAOnline resources: Click here to access online | Access the website In: Safer Families Centre for Research Excellence Discussion paper, no. 1, 2018Summary: Despite the numerous health impacts of reproductive coercion, and the fact that health practitioners are well-placed to respond to women experiencing it, little is known about what an effective health systems response might look like. We have scant evidence to help inform ‘best practice’, and there is a dearth of rigorously-evaluated interventions for reproductive coercion specifically that have been successfully implemented in the health care context. This lack of robust evidence, as well as poor levels of understanding and awareness within the community, have contributed towards the issue of reproductive coercion being neglected in policy, research and practice. (From the document). Record #6010
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Safer Families Centre for Research Excellence Discussion paper, no. 1, 2018

Despite the numerous health impacts of reproductive coercion, and the fact that health practitioners are well-placed to respond to women experiencing it, little is known about what an effective health systems response might look like. We have scant evidence to help inform ‘best practice’, and there is a dearth of rigorously-evaluated interventions for reproductive coercion specifically that have been successfully implemented in the health care context. This lack of robust evidence, as well as poor levels of understanding and awareness within the community, have contributed towards the issue of reproductive coercion being neglected in policy, research and practice. (From the document). Record #6010