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Discursive psychology and domestic violence Alison J. Towns and Peter J. Adams

By: Towns, Alison.
Contributor(s): Adams, Peter J.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Springer, 2018ISBN: 9783319990934.Subject(s): ATTITUDES | DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | GENDER | INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE | MASCULINITY | WOMEN | PREVENTION | NEW ZEALANDOnline resources: Preprint | Link to publication Discourse, Peace and Conflict : Discursive psychology perspectives (pp.49-66) / edited by Stephen Gibson, Springer, 2018Summary: This chapter explores ways in which discursive psychology sheds light on how language justifies, conceals and works to produce the dominance of men in intimate relationships. We demonstrate two ways language can be deployed to achieve these effects. First, the close examination of discourses about violence can reveal much about the way violence against women is justified, minimized and ignored. Second, attention to rhetorical devices deployed in these discourses, such as metaphor, ambiguity and marking strategies, can help in understanding how they are anchored and reinforced in everyday conversations. These forms of discursive enquiry, and other possibilities, open up ways of better understanding the dynamics of men’s violence against women and opportunities for intervention to produce more equitable practices. (First paragraph). Authors' preprint draft available via ResearchGate. Record #6148
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In "Discourse, Peace and Conflict : Discursive psychology perspectives (pp.49-66)" edited by Stephen Gibson, Springer, 2018.

This chapter explores ways in which discursive psychology sheds light on how language justifies, conceals and works to produce the dominance of men in intimate relationships. We demonstrate two ways language can be deployed to achieve these effects. First, the close examination of discourses about violence can reveal much about the way violence against women is justified, minimized and ignored. Second, attention to rhetorical devices deployed in these discourses, such as metaphor, ambiguity and marking strategies, can help in understanding how they are anchored and reinforced in everyday conversations. These forms of discursive enquiry, and other possibilities, open up ways of better understanding the dynamics of men’s violence against women and opportunities for intervention to produce more equitable practices. (First paragraph). Authors' preprint draft available via ResearchGate. Record #6148