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Policing domestic violence : a review of the evidence Christopher Dowling, Anthony Morgan, Chloe Boyd and Isabella Voce

By: Dowling, Christopher.
Contributor(s): Morgan, Anthony | Boyd, Chloe | Voce, Isabella.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: AIC Research report.Publisher: Canberra, ACT : Australian Institute of Criminology, 2018Description: electronic document (141 pages) ; PDF file.ISSN: 2206-7280.Subject(s): DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | INTERVENTION | INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE | JUSTICE | PERPETRATORS | POLICE | POLICE PROCEDURES | PREVENTION | SYSTEMATIC REVIEWS | TRAINING | WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT | VICTIMS OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | AUSTRALIA | ASIA | AUSTRALIA | NEW ZEALAND | PACIFIC ISLANDSOnline resources: Click here to access online AIC Research report, no. 13, 2018Summary: This review examines what is known about the policing of domestic violence. It covers six domains of police involvement in domestic violence—workforce development, reporting to police, first response, prevention of further domestic violence, investigative responses and charging of perpetrators. A systematic search of 10 literature databases, with targeted follow-up searches, identified 346 eligible studies. Findings indicate that police can influence the likelihood of further violence, victim satisfaction and wellbeing, and criminal justice outcomes. Improvements to the policing of domestic violence should focus on optimising the implementation and effectiveness of police responses—specifically, targeting responses at the incidents, victims and perpetrators where they are likely to have the greatest impact; developing the workforce; embracing new technologies and innovative approaches; minimising bureaucratic or administrative barriers to effective police responses; and working closely with victims. (Authors' abstract). Record #6154
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AIC Research report, no. 13, 2018

This review examines what is known about the policing of domestic violence. It covers six domains of police involvement in domestic violence—workforce development, reporting to police, first response, prevention of further domestic violence, investigative responses and charging of perpetrators. A systematic search of 10 literature databases, with targeted follow-up searches, identified 346 eligible studies.

Findings indicate that police can influence the likelihood of further violence, victim satisfaction and wellbeing, and criminal justice outcomes. Improvements to the policing of domestic violence should focus on optimising the implementation and effectiveness of police responses—specifically, targeting responses at the incidents, victims and perpetrators where they are likely to have the greatest impact; developing the workforce; embracing new technologies and innovative approaches; minimising bureaucratic or administrative barriers to effective police responses; and working closely with victims. (Authors' abstract). Record #6154