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Child-centred practice in a bi- and multi-cultural context : Nicola Atwoolchallenges and dilemmas

By: Atwool, Nicola.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleSeries: Child Care in Practice.Publisher: Routledge, 2019Subject(s): Oranga Tamariki, Ministry for Children | PATU TAMARIKI | CHILD PROTECTION | CHILD WELFARE | CHILDREN'S RIGHTS | CULTURAL ISSUES | FAMILIES | INTERVENTION | MĀORI | ORANGA TAMARIKI ACT 1989 | SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE | SOCIAL SERVICES | TAITAMARIKI | TAMARIKI | TOKO I TE ORA | WHĀNAU | NEW ZEALANDOnline resources: Read abstract In: Child Care in Practice, 2019, Advance online publicationSummary: The social service sector in New Zealand is undergoing significant change with the Minister responsible for introducing a new Ministry for Vulnerable Children (now Ministry for Children) signalling a commitment to practice being child-centred and trauma-informed in the new era. There is no shared understanding of these terms or what they will mean for practice. This paper focuses on child-centred practice, beginning with a brief overview of events since 1989 when the Children Young Persons and their Families Act (now renamed the Oranga Tamariki Act) was introduced. Two dominant discourses shaping approaches to care and protection are outlined before posing child-centred practice as a third option addressing the shortcomings of these positions. Three components of child centred practice are discussed: an understanding of power dynamics; a child’s rights perspective and cultural competence. The paper concludes with an overview of what will be needed to embed culturally appropriate child-centred practice and consideration of implications in a global context. (Author's abstract). Record #6163
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Child Care in Practice, 2019, Advance online publication

The social service sector in New Zealand is undergoing significant change with the Minister responsible for introducing a new Ministry for Vulnerable Children (now Ministry for Children) signalling a commitment to practice being child-centred and trauma-informed in the new era. There is no shared understanding of these terms or what they will mean for practice. This paper focuses on child-centred practice, beginning with a brief overview of events since 1989 when the Children Young Persons and their Families Act (now renamed the Oranga Tamariki Act) was introduced. Two dominant discourses shaping approaches to care and protection are outlined before posing child-centred practice as a third option addressing the shortcomings of these positions. Three components of child centred practice are discussed: an understanding of power dynamics; a child’s rights perspective and cultural competence. The paper concludes with an overview of what will be needed to embed culturally appropriate child-centred practice and consideration of implications in a global context. (Author's abstract). Record #6163