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An evaluation of the Ministry of Justice-funded domestic violence programmes Judy Paulin, Elaine Mossman, Nan Wehipeihana, Michele Lennan, Hector Kaiwai and Sue Carswell with Rob Lynn and Emmy Gauper

By: Paulin, Judy.
Contributor(s): Mossman, Elaine | Weihipeihana, Nan | Lennan, Michelle | Kaiwai, Hector | Carswell, Sue.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Wellington, New Zealand : Ministry of Justice, 2018Description: electronic document (146 pages) ; PDF file.Subject(s): CHILD ABUSE | DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | EVALUATION | INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE | MĀORI | PERPETRATOR PROGRAMMES | PERPETRATORS | SAFETY | VICTIMS OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | NEW ZEALANDOnline resources: Click here to access online | Access the website Summary: A report commissioned by the Ministry of Justice into its family violence safety and non-violence programmes has found they are effective in reducing reoffending and helping victims to feel safer. The Ministry commissioned the report early last year to examine the programmes which have been offered to victims and perpetrators of family violence since 2014. The report captures useful insights about what helps and hinders participants, including what enables a positive outcome for Māori whānau. Some key findings of the report were: - Non-violence programmes reduced reoffending in participant offenders; - Non-violence programmes had a positive effect on participants and their whānau, including helping them understand their personal triggers and teaching them self-control; - Participants in safety programmes felt safer and their mental health, self-confidence and sense of self-worth improved; - Skilled facilitators were critical to participants’ successfully engaging in a programme; - Cultural knowledge, values, tools and practice models produced positive outcomes for Māori; - Most participants in non-violence programmes completed them. The report also found ways the programmes could be improved including: - Improve child victims’ access to the safety programmes; - Improve access to joint counselling services for couples who want to stay together; - Independent oversight of the training of programme providers and family violence practitioners; - Specialist training for interpreters. The Ministry plans to use the report’s findings to improve the programmes. (From the website). Record #6171
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Report released 20 February 2019

A report commissioned by the Ministry of Justice into its family violence safety and non-violence programmes has found they are effective in reducing reoffending and helping victims to feel safer.

The Ministry commissioned the report early last year to examine the programmes which have been offered to victims and perpetrators of family violence since 2014. The report captures useful insights about what helps and hinders participants, including what enables a positive outcome for Māori whānau.

Some key findings of the report were:

- Non-violence programmes reduced reoffending in participant offenders;
- Non-violence programmes had a positive effect on participants and their whānau, including helping them understand their personal triggers and teaching them self-control;
- Participants in safety programmes felt safer and their mental health, self-confidence and sense of self-worth improved;
- Skilled facilitators were critical to participants’ successfully engaging in a programme;
- Cultural knowledge, values, tools and practice models produced positive outcomes for Māori;
- Most participants in non-violence programmes completed them.
The report also found ways the programmes could be improved including:

- Improve child victims’ access to the safety programmes;
- Improve access to joint counselling services for couples who want to stay together;
- Independent oversight of the training of programme providers and family violence practitioners;
- Specialist training for interpreters.

The Ministry plans to use the report’s findings to improve the programmes. (From the website). Record #6171