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Pacific youth and violent offending in Aotearoa New Zealand Julia Ioane and Ian Lambie

By: Ioane, Apaula Julia.
Contributor(s): Lambie, Ian.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleSeries: New Zealand Journal of Psychology.Publisher: New Zealand Psychological Society, 2016Subject(s): CHILD ABUSE | CHILD EXPOSURE TO VIOLENCE | CHILDREN | ADOLESCENTS | FAMILY VIOLEENCE | PACIFIC PEOPLES | PASIFIKA | STATISTICS | VIOLENCE | YOUNG OFFENDERS | YOUNG PEOPLE | NEW ZEALANDOnline resources: Click here to access online In: New Zealand Journal of Psychology, 2016, 45(3); 23-29Summary: Pacific youth offenders in Aotearoa New Zealand are over-represented in the rates of violent offences. The purpose of this study was to explore the risk factors that exist amongst this group. Using file data from the New Zealand Police, the offending behaviour and social demographic characteristics of 200 Pacific violent youth offenders aged 10–24 years were investigated. Results revealed that these youth were more likely to be born in Aotearoa, raised in low socio-economic deprivation areas, and that their exposure and involvement in family violence was high. urthermore, their first known offence to Police was generally of a violent nature. Recommendations for clinical practice and implications for future research are discussed. (Authors' abstract). Record #6179
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New Zealand Journal of Psychology, 2016, 45(3); 23-29

Pacific youth offenders in Aotearoa New Zealand are over-represented in the rates of violent offences. The purpose of this study was to explore the risk factors that exist amongst this group. Using file data from the New Zealand Police, the offending behaviour and social demographic characteristics of 200 Pacific violent youth offenders aged 10–24 years were investigated. Results revealed that these youth were more likely to be born in Aotearoa,
raised in low socio-economic deprivation areas, and that their exposure and involvement in family violence was high. urthermore, their first known offence to Police was generally of a violent nature. Recommendations for clinical practice and implications for future research are discussed. (Authors' abstract). Record #6179