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Stories of survival and resilience : Anna Walters and Fred Seymouran enquiry into what helps tamariki and rangatahi through whānau violence

By: Walters, Anna.
Contributor(s): Seymour, Fred.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleSeries: New Zealand Journal of Psychology.Publisher: New Zealand Psychological Society, 2017Subject(s): CHILD REARING | CHILD ABUSE | CHILD EXPOSURE TO VIOLENCE | CHILDREN | FAMILY VIOLENCE | INTERVENTION | MĀORI | RESILIENCE | SELF ESTEEM | YOUNG PEOPLE | MANAWAROA | PATU TAMARIKI | RANGAHAU MĀORI | TAITAMARIKI | TAMARIKI | TIKANGA TUKU IHO | TŪKINOTANGA Ā-WHĀNAU | NEW ZEALANDOnline resources: Click here to access online In: New Zealand Journal of Psychology, 2017, 46(3): 80-87Summary: Family violence is overrepresented amongst Māori and has significant consequences for children. Research on family violence and children, both internationally and locally, has been predominantly deficit-focused. This research focused instead on protective factors and resilience. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with professionals who work with Māori tamariki/rangatahi who have experienced whānau violence, with a focus on their views on resilience and interventions with Māori to enhance resilience. Thematic analysis of transcripts revealed the themes that resilience is complex, internal resources contribute to resilience, and the importance of having a significant supportive person, strong positive Māori identity and wairua connection. Interventions to assist the development of resilience included the importance of building a therapeutic relationship with whānau, early systemic interventions and using Māori guided interventions. (Authors' abstract). Record #6181
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New Zealand Journal of Psychology, 2017, 46(3): 80-87

Family violence is overrepresented amongst Māori and has significant consequences for children. Research on family violence and children, both internationally and locally, has been predominantly deficit-focused. This research focused instead on protective factors and resilience. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with professionals who work with Māori tamariki/rangatahi who have experienced whānau violence, with a focus on their views on resilience and interventions with Māori to enhance resilience. Thematic analysis of transcripts revealed the themes that resilience is complex, internal resources contribute to
resilience, and the importance of having a significant supportive person, strong positive Māori identity and wairua connection. Interventions to assist the development of resilience included the importance of building a therapeutic relationship with whānau, early systemic interventions and using Māori guided interventions. (Authors' abstract). Record #6181