Normal view MARC view ISBD view

He Waipuna Koropupū : Ngaropi Cameron, Leonie Pihama, Jocelyn Millard, Awhina Cameron and Bry KopuTaranaki Māori wellbeing and suicide prevention

By: Cameron, Ngaropi.
Contributor(s): Pihama, Leonie | Millard, Jocelyn | Cameron, Awhina | Kopu, Bry.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Journal of Indigenous Wellbeing: Te Mauri – Pimatisiwin.Publisher: Te Rau Matitini, 2017Subject(s): HISTORICAL TRAUMA | MĀORI | MENTAL HEALTH | SUICIDE | SUICIDE PREVENTION | WELLBEING | YOUNG PEOPLE | HAUORA HINENGARO | ORA | RANGAHAU MĀORI | TAITAMARIKI | MATE WHAKAMOMORI | PĀMAMAE HEKE IHO | NEW ZEALAND | TARANAKIOnline resources: Click here to access online | Related report | Access the website In: Journal of Indigenous Wellbeing: Te Mauri – Pimatisiwin, 2017, 2(2): 105-113Summary: The research project He Waipuna Koropupū aimed to explore and share a knowledge base that could inform practice in relation to Taranaki Māori suicide. The project was grounded upon the notion that through Taranaki knowledge and information we can make significant changes in our approach to life and to our whānau relationships. The project was primarily about whānau ora and the wellbeing of future generations; through the reclamation and sharing of Taranaki Māori knowledge that can support intergenerational change and transformation. Taranaki Māori whānau (extended family groupings), hapū (subtribal grouping) and iwi (tribal grouping) deserve access to Kaupapa Māori approaches in order to help reclaim and inform decision making processes. (Authors' abstract). Follow the link tor the related report and access to the website. Record #6182
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Access online Access online Online Available ON19020026

Journal of Indigenous Wellbeing: Te Mauri – Pimatisiwin, 2017, 2(2): 105-113

The research project He Waipuna Koropupū aimed to explore and share a knowledge base that could inform practice in relation to Taranaki Māori suicide. The project was grounded upon the notion that through Taranaki knowledge and information we can make significant changes in our approach to life and to our whānau relationships. The project was primarily about whānau ora and the wellbeing of future generations; through the reclamation and sharing of Taranaki Māori knowledge that can support intergenerational change and transformation. Taranaki Māori whānau (extended family groupings), hapū (subtribal grouping) and iwi (tribal grouping) deserve access to Kaupapa Māori approaches in order to help reclaim and inform decision making processes. (Authors' abstract). Follow the link tor the related report and access to the website. Record #6182