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Do data from child protective services and the police enhance modelling of perinatal risk for paediatric abusive head trauma? : a retrospective case-control study Patrick Kelly, John M D Thompson, Santuri Rungan, Shanthi Ameratunga, Timothy Jelleyman, Teuila Percival, Hinemoa Elder and Edwin A Mitchell

By: Kelly, Patrick.
Contributor(s): Thompson, John M. D | Rungan, Santuri | Ameratunga, Shanthi | Jelleyman, Timothy | Percival, Teuila | Elder, Hinemoa | Mitchell, Edwin A.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleSeries: BMJ Open.Publisher: BMJ Open, 2019Subject(s): ABUSIVE HEAD TRAUMA | CHILD PROTECTION | DATA ANALYSIS | PREDICTIVE RISK MODELLING | TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY | NEW ZEALANDOnline resources: Click here to access online In: BMJ Open, 2019, 9: e024199Summary: This study is a case-control study examining risk factors for paediatric abusive head trauma (AHT), using data collected well before the outcome of interest took place. This study examined data from multiple sources, matching police and child protective service records for families with perinatal health records for newborn babies. This was a retrospective study, so it was not possible to control the quality and consistency of data collection across health, police and child protective services. Conclusion: Family involvement with child protective services or police is associated with increased risk of AHT. However, accessing such data at the time of birth would add little predictive power to a risk model derived from routine health information. (From the article). Record #6185
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BMJ Open, 2019, 9: e024199

This study is a case-control study examining risk factors for paediatric abusive head trauma (AHT), using data collected well before the outcome of interest took place.

This study examined data from multiple sources, matching police and child protective service records for families with perinatal health records for newborn babies.

This was a retrospective study, so it was not possible to control the quality and consistency of data collection across health, police and child protective services.

Conclusion: Family involvement with child protective services or police is associated with increased risk of AHT. However, accessing such data at the time of birth would
add little predictive power to a risk model derived from routine health information. (From the article). Record #6185