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Not just ‘revenge pornography’ : Australians' experiences of image-based abuse. A summary report Nicola Henry, Anastasia Powell and Asher Flynn

By: Henry, Nicola.
Contributor(s): Powell, Anastasia | Flynn, Asher.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Melbourne, Vic : Gendered Violence and Abuse Research Alliance (GeVARA), RMIT, 2017Description: electronic document (9 pages) ; PDF file.Subject(s): DISABLED PEOPLE | DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE | ONLINE HARASSMENT | PERPETRATORS | PORNOGRAPHY | SEXUAL VIOLENCE | TECHNOLOGY | VICTIMS OF SEXUAL VIOLENCE | YOUNG PEOPLE | AUSTRALIAOnline resources: Click here to access online | Access the website Summary: This report presents key findings from the first stage of a larger program of research. The research examines the extent, nature and impacts of image-based abuse among youth and adults (aged 16 to 49) in Australia, New Zealand and the United Kingdom, and the legal and non-legal responses to image-based abuse in a comparative, cross-country context. The findings presented here are from the national (Australian) online survey of 4,274 participants, 2,406 of which were female (56%) and 1,868 male (44%). Participants ranged in age from 16 to 49, with an average age of 34 years. In addition, 3,764 (88%) participants identified as heterosexual and 510 (12%) identified as lesbian, gay or bisexual (hereafter, LGB). Of those identifying as LGB, 244 identified as female (48%), and 266 (52%) identified as male. All participants were informed that the purpose of the study was to examine attitudes and experiences of sex, technology and relationships. This study was approved by an institutional ethics committee following guidelines as prescribed by the Australian National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research. In the research to date, the researchers have also interviewed a range of experts including police, legal services, as well as sexual and domestic violence support services, to find out more about Australians who have sought advice and support in relation to image-based abuse. The researchers asked these experts about the kinds of situations Australians were experiencing and what changes might be needed to supplement current support services and legal responses. These insights have directly informed recommendations for policy and legal reform, as well as continuing research into victim experiences of image-based abuse. (From the document). Record #6193
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This report presents key findings from the first stage of a larger program of research. The research examines the extent, nature and impacts of image-based abuse among youth and adults (aged 16 to 49) in Australia, New Zealand and the United Kingdom, and the legal and non-legal responses to image-based abuse in a comparative, cross-country context. The findings presented here are from the national (Australian) online survey of 4,274 participants, 2,406 of which were female (56%) and 1,868 male (44%). Participants ranged in age from 16 to 49, with an average age of 34 years. In addition, 3,764 (88%) participants
identified as heterosexual and 510 (12%) identified as lesbian, gay or bisexual (hereafter, LGB). Of those identifying as LGB, 244 identified as female (48%), and 266 (52%) identified as male. All participants were informed that the purpose of the study was to examine attitudes and experiences of sex, technology and relationships. This study was approved by an institutional ethics committee following guidelines as prescribed by the Australian National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research. In the research to date, the researchers have also interviewed a range of experts including police, legal services, as well as sexual and domestic violence support services, to find out more about Australians who have sought advice and support in relation to image-based abuse. The researchers asked these experts about the kinds of situations Australians were experiencing and what changes might be needed to supplement current support services and legal responses. These insights have directly informed recommendations for policy and legal reform, as well as continuing research into victim experiences of image-based abuse. (From the document). Record #6193