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"I keep that hush-hush" : male survivors of sexual abuse and the challenges of disclosure Lynn Sorsoli, Maryam Kia-Keating and Frances K. Grossman

By: Sorsoli, Lynn.
Contributor(s): Kia-Keating, Maryam | Grossman, Frances K.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleSeries: Journal of Counseling Psychology.Publisher: American Psychological Association, 2008Subject(s): ABUSED MEN | ADULT SURVIVORS OF SEXUAL ABUSE | CHILD SEXUAL ABUSE | CHILDREN | DISCLOSURE | NARRATIVE TECHNIQUES | QUALITATIVE RESEARCH | UNITED STATESOnline resources: Click here to access online | Read abstract In: Journal of Counseling Psychology, 2008, 55(3), 333-345Summary: Disclosure is a prominent variable in child sexual abuse research, but little research has examined male disclosure experiences. Sixteen male survivors of childhood sexual abuse were interviewed regarding experiences of disclosure. Analytic techniques included a grounded theory approach to coding and the use of conceptually clustered matrices. Participants described distinct personal (e.g., lack of cognitive awareness, intentional avoidance, emotional readiness, and shame), relational (e.g., fears about negative repercussions, isolation), and sociocultural (e.g., lack of acceptance for men to experience or acknowledge victimization) reasons for their struggles with disclosure. These results highlight that barriers to disclosure exist in multiple domains of experience and are encountered across the lifespan. Implications for future research and clinical interventions are discussed. (Authors' abstract). Record 6217
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Journal of Counseling Psychology, 2008, 55(3), 333-345.

Disclosure is a prominent variable in child sexual abuse research, but little research has examined male disclosure experiences. Sixteen male survivors of childhood sexual abuse were interviewed regarding experiences of disclosure. Analytic techniques included a grounded theory approach to coding and the
use of conceptually clustered matrices. Participants described distinct personal (e.g., lack of cognitive awareness, intentional avoidance, emotional readiness, and shame), relational (e.g., fears about negative repercussions, isolation), and sociocultural (e.g., lack of acceptance for men to experience or acknowledge victimization) reasons for their struggles with disclosure. These results highlight that barriers to disclosure exist in multiple domains of experience and are encountered across the lifespan. Implications for future research and clinical interventions are discussed. (Authors' abstract). Record 6217