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An evaluation of Puawaitahi : New Zealand's first multi-agency for child protection Rachel E. Stevenson

By: Stevenson, Rachel E.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: 2017Description: electronic document (223 pages) ; PDF file.Other title: A thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements of the degree of Doctor of Clinical Psychology, School of Psychology, The University of Auckland.Subject(s): Puawaitahi | New Zealand Police | Oranga Tamariki, Ministry for Children | Te Puaruruhau | CHILD ABUSE | CHILD PROTECTION | CHILD NEGLECT | CHILD SEXUAL ABUSE | EVALUATION | INTERAGENCY COLLABORATION | INTERVENTION | THESES | NEW ZEALAND | AUCKLANDOnline resources: Click here to access online | About Puawaitahi | About Te Puaruruhau Summary: Puawaitahi is New Zealand’s first multi-agency service for child protection. It incorporates health, child protection, Police, evidential interviewing, and therapy services at one centralised location. This research aimed to examine the processes and procedures within the multi-agency. Focus groups and interviews were conducted with staff, referrers and children and families who had been seen within the service. Transcripts were analysed to identify common themes in relation to the multi-agency processes and procedures, the organisation’s culture, accessibility, coordination, timeliness, quality of care, and areas for programme improvement. The programme evaluation found that Puawaitahi meets the majority of its own vision and mission statement goals and performs well in relation to the standards described for Child Advocacy Centres as they are known elsewhere. In particular, the multi-agency processes and procedures provided effective case coordination, and the physical environment, child focused service delivery, staff cultural competence, and interactions with stakeholders were rated highly by most participants across staff, referrer and consumer groups. Desired improvements included better access to therapy, changes to client referral and case coordination processes to further reduce delay, better client follow up procedures, and provision of the multi-agency model across every region in Auckland. This evaluation shows that a model inspired by USA Child Advocacy Centres has been effectively implemented and Puawaitahi stands as a model for implementation elsewhere in New Zealand. Issues concerning the evaluation of such programmes are discussed. (Author's abstract). Record #6234
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Puawaitahi is New Zealand’s first multi-agency service for child protection. It incorporates health, child protection, Police, evidential interviewing, and therapy services at one centralised location. This research aimed to examine the processes and procedures within the multi-agency. Focus groups and interviews were conducted with staff, referrers and children and families who had been seen within the service. Transcripts were analysed to identify common themes in relation to the multi-agency processes and procedures, the organisation’s culture, accessibility, coordination, timeliness, quality of care, and areas for programme improvement. The programme evaluation found that Puawaitahi meets the majority of its own vision and mission statement goals and performs well in relation to the standards described for Child Advocacy Centres as they are known elsewhere. In particular, the multi-agency processes and procedures provided effective case coordination, and the physical environment, child focused service delivery, staff cultural competence, and interactions with stakeholders were rated highly by most participants across staff, referrer and consumer groups. Desired improvements included better access to therapy, changes to client referral and case coordination processes to further reduce delay, better client follow up procedures, and provision of the multi-agency model across every region in Auckland. This evaluation shows that a model inspired by USA Child Advocacy Centres has been effectively implemented and Puawaitahi stands as a model for implementation elsewhere in New Zealand. Issues concerning the evaluation of such programmes are discussed. (Author's abstract). Record #6234