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Technology and family violence in the context of post-separated parenting Katrina Markwick, Andrew Bickerdike, Elisabeth Wilson‐Evered and John Zeleznikow

By: Markwick, Katrina.
Contributor(s): Bickerdike, Andrew | Wilson‐Evered, Elisabeth | Zeleznikow, John.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleSeries: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Family Therapy.Publisher: Wiley, 2019Subject(s): CHILDREN | DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE | ONLINE HARASSMENT | PARENTS | PERPETRATORS | SEPARATION | SOCIAL MEDIA | TECNOLOGY | VICTIMS OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | AUSTRALIAOnline resources: Read the abstract | Special issue TOC In: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Family Therapy, 2019, 40(1): 143-162Summary: Whilst the advent of new and increasingly accessible communication technologies undoubtedly provides new, positive, and effective ways for individuals to communicate and connect with their communities, it simultaneously provides additional means and forums for perpetrators to abuse and harass their victims. Furthermore, such technologies enable perpetrators of family violence to overcome geographical boundaries and continue their abuse post-separation, particularly where there are children of the relationship. This paper reviews and classifies the existing literature on technology-facilitated abuse, identifying predominant themes in relation to context and focus, as well as the gaps. New forms of criminality as well as new ways to perpetrate existing forms of criminality are described. (Authors' abstract). This article appears in Special Issue: Children, Separation, and Divorce: Legal, Facilitative and Family Therapy Interventions and Research. Record #6235
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Australian & New Zealand Journal of Family Therapy, 2019, 40(1): 143-162

Whilst the advent of new and increasingly accessible communication technologies undoubtedly provides new, positive, and effective ways for individuals to communicate and connect with their communities, it simultaneously provides additional means and forums for perpetrators to abuse and harass their victims. Furthermore, such technologies enable perpetrators of family violence to overcome geographical boundaries and continue their abuse post-separation, particularly where there are children of the relationship. This paper reviews and classifies the existing literature on technology-facilitated abuse, identifying predominant themes in relation to context and focus, as well as the gaps. New forms of criminality as well as new ways to perpetrate existing forms of criminality are described. (Authors' abstract). This article appears in Special Issue: Children, Separation, and Divorce: Legal, Facilitative and Family Therapy Interventions and Research. Record #6235