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How do welfare and tax settings affect children’s involvement with child protective services? Oranga Tamariki Evidence Centre

Contributor(s): Oranga Tamariki Evidence Centre.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Evidence brief.Publisher: Wellington, New Zealand : Oranga Tamariki Evidence Centre, 2018Description: electronic document (18 pages) ; PDF file.Subject(s): CHILD ABUSE | CHILD POVERTY | CHILD PROTECTION | CHILD WELFARE | ECONOMIC ASPECTS | GOVERNMENT POLICY | SOCIAL SERVICES | SOCIAL WELFARE | NEW ZEALANDOnline resources: Click here to access online | Access the website Summary: A large body of international research has shown that low income increases the risk of poor outcomes for children. This report outlines key findings from recent experimental and quasi-experimental welfare and tax policy studies that have examined whether the link between income and child maltreatment is causal. It aims to inform discussions on welfare policy settings. This work was one of two papers cooperatively developed with the Ministry of Social Development (MSD). The partner paper (#6244) explores how children are affected by Section 70A benefit deductions, what the impact might be of removing the deductions, and how else claims for child support could be encouraged. Despite some methodological limitations, this developing area of research suggests that welfare and tax policies that affect incomes, particularly for parents supported by a benefit or with low incomes, can impact on the incidence of child maltreatment. Further research is required to replicate these findings in a New Zealand context. (From the website). Record #6243
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Evidence brief

A large body of international research has shown that low income increases the risk of poor outcomes for children. This report outlines key findings from recent experimental and quasi-experimental welfare and tax policy studies that have examined whether the link between income and child maltreatment is causal. It aims to inform discussions on welfare policy settings.

This work was one of two papers cooperatively developed with the Ministry of Social Development (MSD).

The partner paper (#6244) explores how children are affected by Section 70A benefit deductions, what the impact might be of removing the deductions, and how else claims for child support could be encouraged.

Despite some methodological limitations, this developing area of research suggests that welfare and tax policies that affect incomes, particularly for parents supported by a benefit or with low incomes, can impact on the incidence of child maltreatment.

Further research is required to replicate these findings in a New Zealand context. (From the website). Record #6243