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Whānau ora : an indigenous success story Verna Smith, Charlotte Moore, Jacqueline Cumming and Ahohia Boulton

By: Smith, Verna.
Contributor(s): Moore, Charlotte E | Cumming, Jackie | Boulton, Amohia F.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Canberra, ACT : Australian National University Press, 2019Description: electronic document (25 pages) ; PDF file.ISBN: 9781760462796 (Online).Subject(s): FAMILIES | GOVERNMENT POLICY | HEALTH | INDIGENOUS PEOPLES | INTERVENTION | MĀORI | SOCIAL POLICY | SOCIAL SERVICES | SUPPORT SERVICES | WELLBEING | HAUORA | IWI TAKETAKE | ORA | TIKANGA TUKU IHO | TOKO I TE ORA | WHĀNAU | WHĀNAU ORAOnline resources: Click here to access online In: Successful public policy: Lessons from Australia and New Zealand / edited by Joannah Luetjens, Michael Mintrom and Paul `t Hart (pp.505-529)Summary: Whānau Ora (which can be translated as ‘family wellbeing’)[1] is an innovative approach to Indigenous health and social services policy in Aotearoa New Zealand. The initiative empowers whānau (family) as a whole and devolves to whānau members self-determining processes to improve their cultural, social and economic wellbeing. The initiative’s designers aimed for ‘the potential of whānau to do for themselves’ (Humpage 2017: 480) by minimising their dependence on state-delivered benefits and interventions. Building whānau resilience, and the skills and resources of members to manage their own affairs without interference from others, is critical. Intrinsic to this approach is the concept of a ‘strengths’ perspective [2]. (Authors' introduction). Record #6265
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Whānau Ora (which can be translated as ‘family wellbeing’)[1] is an innovative approach to Indigenous health and social services policy in Aotearoa New Zealand. The initiative empowers whānau (family) as a whole and devolves to whānau members self-determining processes to improve their cultural, social and economic wellbeing. The initiative’s designers aimed for ‘the potential of whānau to do for themselves’ (Humpage 2017: 480) by minimising their dependence on state-delivered benefits and interventions. Building whānau resilience, and the skills and
resources of members to manage their own affairs without interference from others, is critical. Intrinsic to this approach is the concept of a ‘strengths’ perspective [2]. (Authors' introduction). Record #6265