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Responding to adverse childhood experiences : An evidence review of interventions to prevent and address adversity across the life course Lisa C. G. Di Lemma, Alisha R. Davies, Kat Ford, Karen Hughes, Lucia Homolova, Benjamin Gray and Gillian Richardson

By: Di Lemma, Lisa C.G.
Contributor(s): Davies, Alisha R | Ford, Kat | Hughes, Karen | Homolova, Lucia | Gray, Benjamin | Richardson, Gillian.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Cardiff : Public Health Wales ; Bangor University, 2019Description: electronic document (44 pages) ; PDF file.ISBN: 978-1-78986-035-1 .Subject(s): ADVERSE CHILDHOOD EXPERIENCES | CHILD ABUSE | CHILD EXPOSURE TO VIOLENCE | CHILD NEGLECT | CHILD SEXUAL ABUSE | INTERVENTION | PARENTING PROGRAMMES | RESILIENCE | SCHOOLS | UNITED KINGDOM | WALESOnline resources: Click here to access online | Access the website Summary: This report examines evidence across a variety of programmes responding to adverse childhood experiences (ACEs). The report looked at programmes and interventions for 11 individual ACE types, and ACEs as a collective term, to identify common approaches across programmes. A series of literature searches were undertaken to identify research evidence on the prevention of ACEs and work to mitigate their harms (for full details of the methodology see Appendix 1). These searches explored reviews from both academic peer-reviewed literature and publicly available reports, published from 2008 to 2018. Given the strong correlation between many ACEs (AcademyHealth, 2016; Early Intervention Foundation [EIF], 2017; Purewal Boparai et al., 2018), the initial search approach focused on interventions to address ACEs and their consequences as a collective term. Subsequent targeted searches to address gaps in the evidence were undertaken. This review is not an exhaustive review of interventions to address each individual ACE type. It draws on previous reviews of evidence. Due to time and resource limitations it is possible that not all interventions have been included in this report. Further, the report is not an exhaustive systematic evidence review on the interventions for specific ACE types, nor does it advocate any specific intervention, rather it seeks to present a summary of the research evidence and information on common approaches across the prevention of ACEs and mitigation of their impact. (From the website and document). Appendix 3: Supporting evidence can be accessed from the website. Record #6292
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This report examines evidence across a variety of programmes responding to adverse childhood experiences (ACEs). The report looked at programmes and interventions for 11 individual ACE types, and ACEs as a collective term, to identify common approaches across programmes.

A series of literature searches were undertaken to identify research evidence on the prevention of ACEs and work to mitigate their harms (for full details of the methodology see Appendix 1). These searches explored reviews from both academic peer-reviewed literature and publicly available reports, published from 2008 to 2018. Given the strong correlation between many ACEs (AcademyHealth, 2016; Early Intervention Foundation [EIF], 2017; Purewal Boparai et al., 2018), the initial search approach focused on interventions to address ACEs and their consequences as a collective term. Subsequent targeted searches to address gaps in the evidence were undertaken. This review is not an exhaustive review of interventions to address each individual ACE type. It draws on previous reviews of evidence. Due to time and resource limitations it is possible that not all interventions have been included in this report. Further, the report is not an exhaustive systematic evidence review on the interventions for specific ACE types, nor does it advocate any specific intervention, rather it seeks to present a summary of the research evidence and information on common approaches across the prevention of ACEs and mitigation of their impact. (From the website and document). Appendix 3: Supporting evidence can be accessed from the website. Record #6292