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Pet abuse as part of intimate partner violence Ang Jury, Natalie Thorburn and Kate Burry

By: Jury, Ang.
Contributor(s): Thorburn, Natalie | Burry, Kate.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Wellington, New Zealand : National Collective of Independent Women’s Refuges, 2018Description: electronic document (25 pages) ; PDF file.Subject(s): National Collective of Independent Women's Refuges Inc | Pet Refuge | ABUSED WOMEN | ANIMAL ABUSE | ANIMAL WELFARE | COERCIVE CONTROL | DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | EMOTIONAL ABUSE | INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE | PHYSICAL ABUSE | PSYCHOLOGICAL ABUSE | VICTIMS OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | NEW ZEALANDOnline resources: Click here to access online Summary: The intersection between the abuse of women and children at the abuse of pets has long since been established, but less has been known about the role that the abuse of women’s pets plays in their experiences of intimate partner violence. Accordingly, this research aimed to explore victims’ experiences of the abuse of their pets, and how this influenced their attempts at seeking safety. Pets represent close and affectionate relationships for many victims. The affection that victims held for their pets was frequently exploited by intimate partners, who threatened or carried out abuse against victims’ pets as a way to demonstrate force and induce compliance. This abuse directed at victims’ pets both delayed and in many cases precluded their attempts to leave the abuser, and led to significant suffering both by pets and by the primary victim of the abuse. The motivations driving abusers’ use of violence towards pets can arguably be understood as indicative of underlying abusive intentions towards women. Three distinct motivations were interpreted from this research – control and intimidation, assertions of supremacy, and silencing of disclosures. These, in addition to their paralyzing impacts, have important ramifications for domestic violence work. In addition, the role that pets unwittingly play as pawns of the abuser highlights the need for tailored services to be offered to them as additional (and pivotal) victims of the abuser. (Authors' abstract). Record #6315
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The intersection between the abuse of women and children at the abuse of pets has long since been established, but less has been known about the role that the abuse of women’s pets plays
in their experiences of intimate partner violence. Accordingly, this research aimed to explore victims’ experiences of the abuse of their pets, and how this influenced their attempts at seeking
safety. Pets represent close and affectionate relationships for many victims. The affection that victims held for their pets was frequently exploited by intimate partners, who threatened or carried out abuse against victims’ pets as a way to demonstrate force and induce compliance. This abuse directed at victims’ pets both delayed and in many cases precluded their attempts to leave the abuser, and led to significant suffering both by pets and by the primary victim of the abuse. The motivations driving abusers’ use of violence towards pets can arguably be understood as indicative of underlying abusive intentions towards women. Three distinct motivations were interpreted from this research – control and intimidation, assertions of supremacy, and silencing of disclosures. These, in addition to their paralyzing impacts, have important ramifications for
domestic violence work. In addition, the role that pets unwittingly play as pawns of the abuser highlights the need for tailored services to be offered to them as additional (and pivotal) victims
of the abuser. (Authors' abstract). Record #6315