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Dignity, diversity, and resistance : a bicultural, community-led approach to transforming social responses to domestic violence in Aotearoa New Zealand Mandy Morgan and Tony Mattson

By: Morgan, Mandy.
Contributor(s): Mattson,Tony.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleSeries: Australian Community Psychologist.Publisher: Australian Psychological Society, 2018Subject(s): Tu Mai Awa | COMMUNITY ACTION | DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | FAMILY VIOLENCE | INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE | MĀORI | NARRATIVE TECHNIQUES | QUALITATIVE RESEARCH | NEW ZEALANDOnline resources: Click here to access online In: Australian Community Psychologist, 2018, 29(2): 5-22Summary: Social problems of domestic violence have been a focus of community and Government attention in Aotearoa New Zealand for over four decades. This article presents early research findings in a community-based social change project that focuses on acts of resistance to interpersonal violence. The praxis of the Tū Mai Awa project is informed by interweaving Māori protocols, principles, and values, with principles of Response-Based Practice, in which domestic violence is recognised as a gendered social problem that is supported by psychologising attributions and other discursive operations. In the first half of this article we present Tu Mai Awa’s framework for a biculturally sensitive and consistent approach to interventions with victims and perpetrators of violence, and to systems advocacy with organisations and institutions across the sector. In the second half of the article, we present findings of research conducted with project participants that aimed to better understand the scope of personal experiences that inform Tu Mai Awa practice. The findings are presented as a thematic analysis of diverse experiences leading to a common commitment to work for non-violent futures, and an analysis of the storylines for telling how we have come to our commitments for change. (Authors' abstract). Record #6425
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Australian Community Psychologist, 2018, 29(2): 5-22

Social problems of domestic violence have been a focus of community and Government attention in Aotearoa New Zealand for over four decades. This article presents early research findings in a community-based social change project that focuses on acts of resistance to interpersonal violence. The praxis of the Tū Mai Awa project is informed by interweaving Māori protocols, principles, and values, with principles of Response-Based
Practice, in which domestic violence is recognised as a gendered social problem that is supported by psychologising attributions and other discursive operations. In the first half
of this article we present Tu Mai Awa’s framework for a biculturally sensitive and
consistent approach to interventions with victims and perpetrators of violence, and to systems advocacy with organisations and institutions across the sector. In the second half of the article, we present findings of research conducted with project participants that
aimed to better understand the scope of personal experiences that inform Tu Mai Awa practice. The findings are presented as a thematic analysis of diverse experiences leading to a common commitment to work for non-violent futures, and an analysis of the storylines for telling how we have come to our commitments for change. (Authors' abstract). Record #6425