Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Reflecting and learning : a grounded theory on reframing deficit views of young indigenous women and safety Denise Wilson, Karina Cootes, Alayne Mikahere-Hall, Juanita Sherwood, Kay Berryman and Debra Jackson

By: , Wilson, Denise.
Contributor(s): Cootes, Karina | Mikahere-Hall, Alayne | Sherwood, Juanita | Berryman, Kay | Jackson, Debra.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleSeries: Health Care for Women International.Publisher: Taylor & Francis, 2019Subject(s): ADOLESCENT RELATIONSHIP ABUSE | ADOLESCENTS | DATING VIOLENCE | INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE | MĀORI | PROTECTIVE FACTORS | QUALITATIVE RESEARCH | SAFETY | YOUNG WOMEN | ĀRAI WHATITATA | AUKATI TŪKINOTANGA | HAUMARUTANGA | MANA WAHINE | RANGAHAU MĀORI | TAIOHI | TAITAMARIKI | WĀHINE | NEW ZEALANDOnline resources: Read abstract In: Health Care for Women International, 2019, Advance online publication, 27 June 2019Summary: Often young indigenous women are framed in ways that problematize and pathologize them, which overlooks their strengths. We interviewed 16 young Indigenous Maori women aged 14 to 18 years about their understandings of safety, being safe, and how they kept themselves and their friends safe. Reflecting and Learning, aided by progressing age and maturity, is the process that mediated their feeling unsafe and keeping safe and resulted in being safe. Young Maori women’s reflecting and learning facilitates relatively mature levels of resourcefulness for navigating being safe, including situations they encountered appear unsafe.(Authors' abstract). Record #6504
No physical items for this record

Health Care for Women International, 2019, Advance online publication, 27 June 2019

Often young indigenous women are framed in ways that problematize and pathologize them, which overlooks their strengths. We interviewed 16 young Indigenous Maori women aged 14 to 18 years about their understandings of safety, being safe, and how they kept themselves and their friends safe. Reflecting and Learning, aided by progressing age and maturity, is the process that mediated their feeling unsafe and keeping safe and resulted in being safe. Young Maori women’s reflecting and learning facilitates relatively mature levels of resourcefulness for navigating being safe, including situations
they encountered appear unsafe.(Authors' abstract). Record #6504