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Making sense of being in care, adopted, or whāngai : perspectives of rangatahi, young people, and those who are raising them. Qualitative study Helen Potter and Míša Urbanová

By: Potter, Helen.
Contributor(s): Urbanová, Míša.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Wellington, New Zealand : Oranga Tamariki, Ministry for Children, 2021Description: electronic document (90 pages) : PDF file: 924 MB.ISBN: 978-1-99-115371-5.Subject(s): Oranga Tamariki, Ministry for Children | ADOPTION | ATTITUDES | CAREGIVERS | CHILD PROTECTION | CHILDREN | FOSTER CARE | KINSHIP CARE | MĀORI | QUALITATIVE RESEARCH | SOCIAL SERVICES | YOUNG PEOPLE | RANGAHAU MĀORI | TAIOHI | TAITAMARIKI | TAMARIKI | TOKO I TE ORA | WHĀNGAI | NEW ZEALANDOnline resources: Download literature review, PDF, 924 KB | Access the website Summary: There are many children in New Zealand raised by people other than their birth parents. This qualitative study and literature review explores the perspectives of children and young people and those who care for them. The qualitative study found that: social workers were aware of children’s rights to be informed of their care status, and to have this explained in an age-appropriate way, but felt they wanted to spend more time with children to support their understanding; children were mostly informed of their situation at a young age or early in the process, but some felt they could be told earlier, and given more honest explanations; caregivers didn’t always have full information about a child’s background, especially if the placement was temporary or uncertain; children and caregivers tended not to use the term ‘in care’ and found other ways to describe their living situation that avoided any associated stigma. (From the website). See also the literature review (#7390). Record #7391
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There are many children in New Zealand raised by people other than their birth parents. This qualitative study and literature review explores the perspectives of children and young people and those who care for them.

The qualitative study found that: social workers were aware of children’s rights to be informed of their care status, and to have this explained in an age-appropriate way, but felt they wanted to spend more time with children to support their understanding; children were mostly informed of their situation at a young age or early in the process, but some felt they could be told earlier, and given more honest explanations; caregivers didn’t always have full information about a child’s background, especially if the placement was temporary or uncertain; children and caregivers tended not to use the term ‘in care’ and found other ways to describe their living situation that avoided any associated stigma. (From the website). See also the literature review (#7390). Record #7391

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