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Impact of COVID-19 pandemic on violence against women and girls Erika Fraser

By: Fraser, Erika.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleSeries: VAWG Helpdesk Research Report.Publisher: London : VAWG Helpdesk, 2020Description: electronic document (16 pages) ; PDF file: 410 KB.Subject(s): COVID-19 | DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE | PANDEMICS | SEXUAL VIOLENCE | VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN | INTERNATIONALOnline resources: Download report, PDF, 410 KB | Read other VAWG Helpdesk reports VAWG Helpdesk Research Report, no. 284, March 2020Summary: Since its outbreak, COVID-19 has infected hundreds of thousands of people across the world and created a range of primary and secondary effects on different individuals and communities (Wenham et al, 2020). The Director General of the World Health Organisation declared coronavirus (COVID-19) a global pandemic on 11 March 2020. This rapid research query summarises the evidence of the COVID-19 pandemic on violence against women and girls (VAWG), as well as other similar epidemics. Evidence on the impact of COVID-19 remains at an early stage and mostly comes from news articles and reports from women’s organisations. Key evidence gaps from both the COVID-19 pandemic and other similar outbreaks include: (1) limited data on how levels of violence change; (2) lack of disaggregated data particularly for vulnerable groups such as adolescent girls, older women, women and girls with disabilities, and refugee/migrant women; (3) limited research on the pathways of violence and how outbreaks can exacerbate different forms of violence against women and girls; and (4) few documented examples of good practice in preventing and responding to violence against women and girls during an outbreak. So far, we are seeing impacts in middle income and high income countries, but this picture is likely to change rapidly in the coming weeks and concerns have been raised about potential impacts in emergency settings with displaced and mobile populations, as well as in overcrowded peri-urban settlements in many cities throughout the world. Potential impacts are likely to be exacerbated in contexts with weak health systems, weak rule of law, and existing high levels of VAWG and gender inequality. (From the document published 18 March 2020). Record #7470
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VAWG Helpdesk Research Report, no. 284, March 2020

Since its outbreak, COVID-19 has infected hundreds of thousands of people across the world and created a range of primary and secondary effects on different individuals and communities (Wenham et al, 2020). The Director General of the World Health Organisation declared coronavirus (COVID-19) a global pandemic on 11 March 2020. This rapid research query summarises the evidence of the COVID-19 pandemic on violence against women and girls (VAWG), as well as other similar epidemics.

Evidence on the impact of COVID-19 remains at an early stage and mostly comes from news articles and reports from women’s organisations. Key evidence gaps from both the COVID-19 pandemic and other similar outbreaks include: (1) limited data on how levels of violence change; (2)
lack of disaggregated data particularly for vulnerable groups such as adolescent girls, older women, women and girls with disabilities, and refugee/migrant women; (3) limited research on the pathways of violence and how outbreaks can exacerbate different forms of violence against women and girls; and (4) few documented examples of good practice in preventing and responding to violence against women and girls during an outbreak. So far, we are seeing impacts in middle income and high income countries, but this picture is likely to change rapidly in the coming weeks and concerns have
been raised about potential impacts in emergency settings with displaced and mobile populations, as well as in overcrowded peri-urban settlements in many cities throughout the world. Potential impacts are likely to be exacerbated in contexts with weak health systems, weak rule of law, and existing high levels of VAWG and gender inequality. (From the document published 18 March 2020). Record #7470

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