Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Power and control in family violence Hann, Sheryl

By: Hann, Sheryl.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleSeries: Social Work Now.Publisher: Wellington Child, Youth and Family 2007Description: 35 p. ; computer file : PDF format (3Mb).ISSN: 1173-4906.Subject(s): PREVENTION | SEXUAL VIOLENCE | CHILD ABUSE | RECOMMENDED READING | ABUSIVE MEN | CHILDREN | COERCIVE CONTROL | DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | EMOTIONAL ABUSE | GENDER | HOMICIDE | INTERVENTION | | PHYSICAL ABUSE | PSYCHOLOGICAL ABUSE | SOCIAL SERVICES | WOMENOnline resources: Click here to access online In: Social Work Now, September 2007, 37: 17-25Summary: This article discusses the power and control analysis of partner abuse as employed by the National Collective of Independent Women's Refuges. The article traces the evolution of the power and control analysis from its development by the Duluth Abuse Intervention Project in the early 1980s, through its utilisation and adaptation in the form of the power and control wheels, by various partner abuse intervention agencies and advocates such as Women's Refuge, to its recognition in New Zealand's Domestic Violence Act (1995). The author describes the power and control analysis as "a grounded theory that recognises domestic violence as a gendered issue." The acceptance of the power and control analysis in government dates from the Family Violence Prevention Advisory Committee in the mid 1980s to the current Taskforce for Action on Violence within Families. The author argues that the power and control analysis, the wheel tools, and the understanding of violent and coercive behaviours they provide enhance the safety of children and their families.
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Access online Access online Online Available ON12070266

Social Work Now, September 2007, 37: 17-25

Recommended reading

This article discusses the power and control analysis of partner abuse as employed by the National Collective of Independent Women's Refuges. The article traces the evolution of the power and control analysis from its development by the Duluth Abuse Intervention Project in the early 1980s, through its utilisation and adaptation in the form of the power and control wheels, by various partner abuse intervention agencies and advocates such as Women's Refuge, to its recognition in New Zealand's Domestic Violence Act (1995). The author describes the power and control analysis as "a grounded theory that recognises domestic violence as a gendered issue." The acceptance of the power and control analysis in government dates from the Family Violence Prevention Advisory Committee in the mid 1980s to the current Taskforce for Action on Violence within Families. The author argues that the power and control analysis, the wheel tools, and the understanding of violent and coercive behaviours they provide enhance the safety of children and their families.

nz