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Attitudes to family violence : a study across cultures prepared by Synergy Applied Research Limited & Hinematau McNeill ... [et al.].McNeill, Hinematu; von Dadelszen, Jane; Gray, Alison; Duituturaga, Emele; Good, Raewyn; Ash, Rosemary

Contributor(s): McNeill, Hinematau | Von Dadelszen, Jane | Gray, Alison | Duituturaga, Emele | Good, Raewyn | Ash, Rosemary | New Zealand. Family Violence Prevention Co-ordinating Committee | Synergy Applied Research Ltd.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Wellington, [N.Z]. : F.V.P.C.C., Dept. of Social Welfare, [1988]Description: 129 p. : ill. ; 30 cm.ISBN: 047707281X (pbk.).Subject(s): CULTURAL DIFFERENCES | DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | EMOTIONAL ABUSE | INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE | MĀORI | MEDIA | PACIFIC PEOPLES | PASIFIKA | PHYSICAL ABUSE | POLICY | PSYCHOLOGICAL ABUSE | RANGAHAU MĀORI | RESEARCH | SEXUAL ABUSE | STATISTICS | TATAURANGA | VIOLENCE | NEW ZEALAND | CULTURE | TŪKINOTANGA Ā-WHĀNAUDDC classification: 362.8292 ATT Summary: This report is the first major attempt to look at attitudes towards family violence in New Zealand. The research involved three separate studies covering Māori, Pacific Islands and Pākehā perspectives. Methodology appropriate to each cultural group was employed and in-depth personal and group interviews were conducted by 'own-culture' interviewers. Respondents came from all age groups, from rural and urban areas, and a variety of socioeconomic backgrounds. The sample does not aim to be statistically representative of the New Zealand population, but to present views on family violence from 'those whose views were least likely to be known.' (p7) While the studies were independently designed and executed, researchers from the three groups consulted throughout. This approach means that particular aspects of violence may have received more attention in one group than others. For example, in the Māori study, there is more detailed information on attitudes towards sexual abuse than in the Pacific Islands or the Pākehā study. The report groups the different types of violence identified by respondents into six main categories: physical, verbal, mental/emotional, sexual, spiritual and cultural. The study uncovers different attitudes to these types of violence, both within and between the different cultural groups, although some of the cross-cultural differences stem from the difference in the depth of probing within each individual study. The report includes general recommendations for policy and programmes, including a recommendation that the parallel study approach be used again in a more co-ordinated fashion. The authors suggest that further research is needed into actions that will empower people to deal with violence.
Item type Current location Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode
Report Report TRO 362.8292 ATT Available FV16080087
Report Report TRO 362.8292 ATT Available FV13060370
Report Report TRO 362.8292 ATT Copy 1 Available A00669849B
Report Report TRO 362.8292 ATT Copy 2 Available A00734659B
Report Report TRO 362.8292 ATT 1988 Copy 3 Missing A00669865B
Report Report TRO 362.8292 ATT Copy 4 Missing A0075241AB
Report Report TRO 362.8292 ATT 1988 Copy 5 Available A00672440B
Report Report TRO 362.8292 ATT Unbound Copy Not for loan A0066877AB

Includes Māori study by Hinematau McNeill, Pākehā study by Alison Gray and Pacific Island study by Emele Duituturaga

This report is the first major attempt to look at attitudes towards family violence in New Zealand. The research involved three separate studies covering Māori, Pacific Islands and Pākehā perspectives. Methodology appropriate to each cultural group was employed and in-depth personal and group interviews were conducted by 'own-culture' interviewers. Respondents came from all age groups, from rural and urban areas, and a variety of socioeconomic backgrounds. The sample does not aim to be statistically representative of the New Zealand population, but to present views on family violence from 'those whose views were least likely to be known.' (p7) While the studies were independently designed and executed, researchers from the three groups consulted throughout. This approach means that particular aspects of violence may have received more attention in one group than others. For example, in the Māori study, there is more detailed information on attitudes towards sexual abuse than in the Pacific Islands or the Pākehā study. The report groups the different types of violence identified by respondents into six main categories: physical, verbal, mental/emotional, sexual, spiritual and cultural. The study uncovers different attitudes to these types of violence, both within and between the different cultural groups, although some of the cross-cultural differences stem from the difference in the depth of probing within each individual study. The report includes general recommendations for policy and programmes, including a recommendation that the parallel study approach be used again in a more co-ordinated fashion. The authors suggest that further research is needed into actions that will empower people to deal with violence.

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