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Māori Research Agenda on Family Violence = Rangahau Tūkino Whānau

By: Te Puni Kōkiri.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Wellington, New Zealand : Te Puni Kōkiri, 2010Description: electronic document (84 p.); PDF file: 809 KB.Subject(s): CULTURE | FAMILY VIOLENCE | TŪKINOTANGA Ā-WHĀNAU | RECOMMENDED READING | DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE | MANAWAROA | MĀORI | RANGAHAU MĀORI | RESEARCH | RESILIENCE | NEW ZEALANDOnline resources: Summary | Click here to access online | Also available at Summary: This paper outlines Māori research priorities to support the development of an evidence base for Māori approaches to eliminating family violence, and provides information on the efficacy of culturally distinct approaches. The paper is structured in three parts: programme studies which describe the culturally distinct aspects of three Māori service providers' programmes; a literature review, which finds family violence in Māori communities is serious, entrenched and intergenerational. However the literature review notes a shortage of new research and points out that most newer material comes from programme evaluation; the views of Māori whānau violence experts, a group convened by Te Puni Kōkiri to guide this research. Seven key research areas are suggested as priorities: defining whānau violence; understanding the origins of whānau violence; affirming and valuing culturally distinct approaches to whānau violence; building an evidence base about "what works" in relation to whānau violence; evidencing whānau, hapū and iwi based approaches to whānau violence; understanding the critical organisational factors that support innovation and resilience in the delivery of kaupapa Māori approaches to whānau violence; and exploring the potential utility of indigenous approaches to whānau violence.
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This paper outlines Māori research priorities to support the development of an evidence base for Māori approaches to eliminating family violence, and provides information on the efficacy of culturally distinct approaches. The paper is structured in three parts: programme studies which describe the culturally distinct aspects of three Māori service providers' programmes; a literature review, which finds family violence in Māori communities is serious, entrenched and intergenerational. However the literature review notes a shortage of new research and points out that most newer material comes from programme evaluation; the views of Māori whānau violence experts, a group convened by Te Puni Kōkiri to guide this research. Seven key research areas are suggested as priorities: defining whānau violence; understanding the origins of whānau violence; affirming and valuing culturally distinct approaches to whānau violence; building an evidence base about "what works" in relation to whānau violence; evidencing whānau, hapū and iwi based approaches to whānau violence; understanding the critical organisational factors that support innovation and resilience in the delivery of kaupapa Māori approaches to whānau violence; and exploring the potential utility of indigenous approaches to whānau violence.

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