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Living at the cutting edge : women's experiences of protection orders : volume 1 : the women's stories Robertson, Neville R.; Busch, Ruth; D'Souza, Radha; Sheung, Fiona Lam; Anand, Reynu; Balzer, Roma; Simpson, Ariana; Paina, Dulcie

By: Robertson, Neville R.
Contributor(s): Busch, Ruth | D'Souza, Radha | Sheung, Fiona Lam | Anand, Reynu | Balzer, Roma | Simpson, Ariana | Paina, Dulcie.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Hamilton University of Waikato 2007Description: 260 p. ; computer file : PDF format (1.6mb).Subject(s): LAW | SEXUAL VIOLENCE | RECOMMENDED READING | ABUSED WOMEN | CHILDREN | ABUSED WOMEN | DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | FAMILY COURT | HOMICIDE | INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE | JUSTICE | MĀORI | MIGRANTS | PACIFIC PEOPLES | PASIFIKA | PHYSICAL ABUSE | PROTECTION ORDERS | PSYCHOLOGICAL ABUSE | MĀORI | VICTIMS OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | NEW ZEALANDOnline resources: Click here to access online Summary: This report, which investigates women's experiences of protection orders, was commissioned by the Ministry of Women's Affairs and is published in two volumes. The objectives of the report were to: (a) identify and describe the experiences of a sample of women in obtaining protection orders, the impact of protection orders and the response to breaches of protection orders; (b) identify those aspects that are working well (i.e. positive experiences of protection orders); and (c) identify areas for improvement including barriers that prevent women from applying for and obtaining protection orders. Central to the report are 43 case studies of women with discussion on their experiences of domestic violence and seeking safety. The research also draws on other sources of information including: interviews with family law practitioners, women's advocates, stopping violence workers, Ministry of Justice personnel, social workers and community workers; decisions of the Family Court and criminal courts relating to domestic violence (including applications for protection orders and prosecutions for breaching such orders, as well as relevant decisions of the Residence Review Board); statistical information relating to applications for protection orders; and social science and legal research on domestic violence. The key findings of the research were that, although the Domestic Violence Act (1995) and the concurrent amendments made to the Guardianship Act (1968) are sound legislation, there was frustration with various aspects of the implementation of the legislation. This was borne out in the case studies, the analysis of decided cases, and the analysis of statistical information. Volume one (chapters one to six), discussed here, presents the stories of Maori, Pakeha, Pacific, and other ethnic minority women. An executive summary of the report is also provided in volume one. There are 47 recommendations included in the executive summary, which suggest ways to improve the effectiveness of protection orders. These cover the following: suggested amendments to relevant legislation, recommendations for family law practitioners, legal services agencies, Domestic Violence Act (1995) programmes, the New Zealand Police, immigration issues, Child, Youth and Family services, and the community and non-government organisation sector. The authors suggest that mechanisms are needed which ensure the law is implemented as it is written.
Item type Current location Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode
Access online Access online Online Available ON12070268
Report Report TRO 362.8292 ROB Vol. 1 : The Women's Stories Available A0067205AB

For the government's response to the report recommendations see: http://www.mwa.govt.nz/news-and-pubs/publications/po.html#response

Recommended reading

This report, which investigates women's experiences of protection orders, was commissioned by the Ministry of Women's Affairs and is published in two volumes. The objectives of the report were to: (a) identify and describe the experiences of a sample of women in obtaining protection orders, the impact of protection orders and the response to breaches of protection orders; (b) identify those aspects that are working well (i.e. positive experiences of protection orders); and (c) identify areas for improvement including barriers that prevent women from applying for and obtaining protection orders. Central to the report are 43 case studies of women with discussion on their experiences of domestic violence and seeking safety. The research also draws on other sources of information including: interviews with family law practitioners, women's advocates, stopping violence workers, Ministry of Justice personnel, social workers and community workers; decisions of the Family Court and criminal courts relating to domestic violence (including applications for protection orders and prosecutions for breaching such orders, as well as relevant decisions of the Residence Review Board); statistical information relating to applications for protection orders; and social science and legal research on domestic violence. The key findings of the research were that, although the Domestic Violence Act (1995) and the concurrent amendments made to the Guardianship Act (1968) are sound legislation, there was frustration with various aspects of the implementation of the legislation. This was borne out in the case studies, the analysis of decided cases, and the analysis of statistical information. Volume one (chapters one to six), discussed here, presents the stories of Maori, Pakeha, Pacific, and other ethnic minority women. An executive summary of the report is also provided in volume one. There are 47 recommendations included in the executive summary, which suggest ways to improve the effectiveness of protection orders. These cover the following: suggested amendments to relevant legislation, recommendations for family law practitioners, legal services agencies, Domestic Violence Act (1995) programmes, the New Zealand Police, immigration issues, Child, Youth and Family services, and the community and non-government organisation sector. The authors suggest that mechanisms are needed which ensure the law is implemented as it is written.

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