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Sexual coercion among gay men, bisexual men and takatapui tane in Aotearoa/New Zealand Fenaughty, John; Braun, Virginia; Gavey, Nicola; Aspin, Clive; Reynolds, Paul; Schmidt, Johanna

By: Fenaughty, John.
Contributor(s): Braun, Virginia | Gavey, Nicola | Aspin, Clive | Reynolds, Paul | Schmidt, Johanna.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Auckland Department of Psychology, University of Auckland 2006Description: 51 p. ; computer file : PDF format (499Kb).ISBN: 0908689799.Subject(s): ABUSED MEN | BISEXUAL | HEALTH | LGBTIQ | MALE RAPE | MĀORI | MEN | POLICY | RESEARCH | SAME SEX RELATIONSHIPS | SEXUAL ABUSE | SEXUAL HARASSMENT | SEXUAL HEALTH | TAKATĀPUI | TANE | INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE | GAY | NEW ZEALAND | SEXUAL VIOLENCEDDC classification: 306.76 SEX Online resources: Click here to access online Summary: This report presents the findings from two studies designed to explore the phenomenon of sexual coercion among gay and bisexual men in Aotearoa/New Zealand. The separate, but related, studies were a broader project involving six focus groups and 18 interviews with gay and bisexual men and 23 interviews with key informants, and a kaupapa Maori project in which five takatāpui tāne were interviewed. Key findings include: the vast majority of incidents reported occurred in the context of interactions that were initially, or at least potentially, consensual sexual encounters. Differences in age and experience were frequently identified as a dynamic that enabled sexual coercion. Gay and bisexual men do not generally talk openly about sexual coercion and unwanted sex and thus do not access support services or report sexual assault to justice authorities. The debilitating impact of sexual coercion on the lives and well-being of Maori men and their communities needs to be acknowledged so that appropriate interventions and services can be developed and implemented. While the authors identified some specific features of gay male culture which appear to contribute to vulnerability to sexual coercion, overall the dynamics of sexual coercion among men who have sex with men had much in common with the dynamics of heterosexual coercion experienced by women. The authors conclude that masculinity and male sexuality per se, rather than gay masculinity and gay male sexuality, in particular, are key to understanding sexual coercion among gay and bisexual men. The authors discuss implications for policy and practice, and provide specific recommendations in relation to breaking the silence on sexual coercion; norms, power and vulnerabilities; the internet, venues and risk; HIV and sexual health; and specific issues for Maori.
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book Book TRO 306.76 SEX Available A00668311B

This report presents the findings from two studies designed to explore the phenomenon of sexual coercion among gay and bisexual men in Aotearoa/New Zealand. The separate, but related, studies were a broader project involving six focus groups and 18 interviews with gay and bisexual men and 23 interviews with key informants, and a kaupapa Maori project in which five takatāpui tāne were interviewed. Key findings include: the vast majority of incidents reported occurred in the context of interactions that were initially, or at least potentially, consensual sexual encounters. Differences in age and experience were frequently identified as a dynamic that enabled sexual coercion. Gay and bisexual men do not generally talk openly about sexual coercion and unwanted sex and thus do not access support services or report sexual assault to justice authorities. The debilitating impact of sexual coercion on the lives and well-being of Maori men and their communities needs to be acknowledged so that appropriate interventions and services can be developed and implemented. While the authors identified some specific features of gay male culture which appear to contribute to vulnerability to sexual coercion, overall the dynamics of sexual coercion among men who have sex with men had much in common with the dynamics of heterosexual coercion experienced by women. The authors conclude that masculinity and male sexuality per se, rather than gay masculinity and gay male sexuality, in particular, are key to understanding sexual coercion among gay and bisexual men. The authors discuss implications for policy and practice, and provide specific recommendations in relation to breaking the silence on sexual coercion; norms, power and vulnerabilities; the internet, venues and risk; HIV and sexual health; and specific issues for Maori.

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