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A league table of child maltreatment deaths in rich nations

Contributor(s): UNICEF.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Publisher: Florence, Italy UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre 2003Description: 36 p. ; computer file : PDF format (267Kb).ISBN: 8885401945.ISSN: 1605-7317.Subject(s): ADOLESCENTS | CHILD NEGLECT | CHILDREN | RESEARCH | STATISTICS | SURVEYS | TRENDS | YOUNG PEOPLE | INTERNATIONAL COMPARISON | CHILD ABUSEDDC classification: 362.7615 LEA Online resources: Click here to access online Summary: This report attempts to draw a comparative picture of the physical abuse of children in the 27 richest nations of the world. UNICEF research estimates that almost 3,500 children under the age of 15 die from physical abuse and neglect every year in the industrialized world. The greatest risk is among younger children. A small group of countries - Spain, Greece, Italy, Ireland and Norway - appear to have an exceptionally low incidence of child maltreatment deaths; Belgium, the Czech Republic, New Zealand, Hungary and France have levels that are 4 to 6 times higher. The United States, Mexico and Portugal have rates that are between 10 and 15 times higher than those at the top of the league table. The good news is that child deaths from maltreatment appear to be declining in the great majority of industrialized countries.
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Access online Access online Online Available ON13070397
Report Report TRO 362.7615 LEA Available A0066829AB

This report attempts to draw a comparative picture of the physical abuse of children in the 27 richest nations of the world. UNICEF research estimates that almost 3,500 children under the age of 15 die from physical abuse and neglect every year in the industrialized world. The greatest risk is among younger children. A small group of countries - Spain, Greece, Italy, Ireland and Norway - appear to have an exceptionally low incidence of child maltreatment deaths; Belgium, the Czech Republic, New Zealand, Hungary and France have levels that are 4 to 6 times higher. The United States, Mexico and Portugal have rates that are between 10 and 15 times higher than those at the top of the league table. The good news is that child deaths from maltreatment appear to be declining in the great majority of industrialized countries.

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