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Responding to elder abuse and neglect : assessment and referral procedures Keys, Fleur

By: Keys, Fleur.
Contributor(s): New Zealand. Office for Senior Citizens.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: [Wellington] 2003Description: 48 p.Subject(s): ELDER ABUSE | NEGLECT | SOCIAL SERVICES | NEW ZEALAND | OLDER PEOPLEDDC classification: 362.6042 RES Summary: This working paper contributes to a larger review of elder abuse and neglect prevention services in New Zealand commissioned by the Office for Senior Citizens. It reviews literature on assessment and referral procedures for responding to elder abuse and neglect. The literature is largely drawn from the USA, Canada, England and Wales. New Zealand sources, and those of Australia, are considered, but not to the same degree. Most of the New Zealand literature provides contextual information for this paper. The objectives of this review are to provide a broad context within which the overall review questions can be examined; to highlight the criteria and requirements for effective elder abuse and neglect assessment and referral procedures; and to identify any areas of controversy in the literature. The paucity of research and evaluation material in the area of assessment and referral procedures meant that an intended aim of providing a description of 'good practice' was not possible. Therefore, the paper highlights emerging themes and practice directions that were gleaned from the literature. A brief definition of elder abuse and neglect and an examination of the risk factors is given. A generic elder abuse and neglect intervention process is traversed, along with an overview of the international practice in responding to this type of abuse. It is concluded that no universally accepted definition of what constitutes elder abuse and neglect exists, and that in responding to reports of abuse and neglect, there is no 'best practice' approach. It is also noted that there is a lack of attention to ethnic diversity, and a recommendation is made to develop assessment and referral processes that acknowledge different cultural understandings of, and approaches to, the issues of elder abuse and neglect.
Item type Current location Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode
Report Report TRO 362.6042 RES Available A00670340B
Report Report TRO 362.6042 RES Available A00760692B
Report Report TRO 362.6042 RES REF copy Available FV12090413

On cover: Working paper prepared for the Office for Senior Citizens. December 2003.

This working paper contributes to a larger review of elder abuse and neglect prevention services in New Zealand commissioned by the Office for Senior Citizens. It reviews literature on assessment and referral procedures for responding to elder abuse and neglect. The literature is largely drawn from the USA, Canada, England and Wales. New Zealand sources, and those of Australia, are considered, but not to the same degree. Most of the New Zealand literature provides contextual information for this paper. The objectives of this review are to provide a broad context within which the overall review questions can be examined; to highlight the criteria and requirements for effective elder abuse and neglect assessment and referral procedures; and to identify any areas of controversy in the literature. The paucity of research and evaluation material in the area of assessment and referral procedures meant that an intended aim of providing a description of 'good practice' was not possible. Therefore, the paper highlights emerging themes and practice directions that were gleaned from the literature. A brief definition of elder abuse and neglect and an examination of the risk factors is given. A generic elder abuse and neglect intervention process is traversed, along with an overview of the international practice in responding to this type of abuse. It is concluded that no universally accepted definition of what constitutes elder abuse and neglect exists, and that in responding to reports of abuse and neglect, there is no 'best practice' approach. It is also noted that there is a lack of attention to ethnic diversity, and a recommendation is made to develop assessment and referral processes that acknowledge different cultural understandings of, and approaches to, the issues of elder abuse and neglect.

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